New Film Tells Story of Mack Robinson and Other Black Olympians in 1936 Nazi Olympic Games

first_img Top of the News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday More Cool Stuff Business News Community News Community News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Herbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Mental Health Chatbot Which Helps People With DepressionHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThink The Lost Weight Won’t Be Regained If You Stop Eating A Lot?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyKeep Your Skin Flawless With These Indian Beauty RemediesHerbeautyHerbeauty 7 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m.center_img Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Subscribe top box 4 New Film Tells Story of Mack Robinson and Other Black Olympians in 1936 Nazi Olympic Games From STAFF REPORTS Published on Wednesday, August 3, 2016 | 4:46 pm Make a comment EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS First Heatwave Expected Next Week Pasadena athlete Mack Robinson and 17 other black Americans defied Jim Crow and Adolf Hitler in 1936, and went on to win hearts and medals at the Summer Olympic Games in Berlin that year, even when they represented a country that considered them second-class citizens and competed in a country that rolled out the red carpet in spite of what was then an undercurrent of Aryan superiority and anti-Semitism.A new film being released August 5 tells the story of those storied days and people, the 18 black American Olympians – 16 men and two women – who were heroes for America in the Summer Olympics in Berlin, but returned home to a short-lived glory because at that time, racial segregation in most facets of American society, even in sports, was widely practiced.The film, “Olympic Pride, American Prejudice,” has been screened at several film festivals, including the Los Angeles Film Festival and the American Black Film Festival, and opens for theatrical release on Friday, August 5 in New York City and in Santa Monica, California.“Olympic Pride, American Prejudice,” which took four years to complete, now tells the story of the 17 other Americans, including Mack Robinson, Jackie Robinson’s elder brother. Mack Robinson placed second in the 200 meters at the U.S. Olympics Trials in 1936, earning a place on the Olympic Team. He went on to win the silver medal at the Olympics in Berlin, finishing 0.4 seconds behind Jesse Owens.Mack Robinson was born in Cairo, Georgia, in 1914. He and Jackie and his other siblings were left fatherless at an early age. Their mother, Mallie, was the sole support of the children. She performed in a variety of manual labour tasks, and moved with her children to Pasadena while the children were still young.Mack set national junior college records in the 100 meter, 200 meter, and long jump at Pasadena Junior College. Then he placed second in the 200 meters at the United States Olympic Trials in 1936, earning himself a place on the Olympic team.The movie’s release coincides with the 80th anniversary of the 1936 Olympics which many believed Hitler organized in Berlin as part of Nazi propaganda promoting Aryan racial superiority. The XI Olympiad played August 1 to 16 that year.Before this documentary, much of black Americans’ participation in the 1936 Olympics was centered on Jesse Owens, who won four gold medals in track and field and was the most successful athlete in that Olympics. At least two films have been made about Jesse Owens, one in 1984, and the latest, “Race,” released in February this year.Before the concept for the documentary was made, writer-director Deborah Riley Draper herself thought Jesse Owens was the only one on the 1936 Olympic Team.“After doing research, we discovered 17 others, including two women,” Draper tells the online TV program Black Hollywood Live Conversations. “It’s a really powerful story, because these are kids. They were on a boat for 10 days headed to Nazi Germany to represent America, where they were second-class citizens. And then when they get to Berlin, a few interesting things happen: they were able to get on the bus. They were able to get into restaurants and sit out and be served. So this really changed their perspective. And when they came home, while the stories may not have been known, you know the impact, because Mack Robinson – Jackie Robinson’s brother – was on that 1936 team. Ten years after Mack, Jackie Robinson breaks the color barrier in American baseball.”Draper, a former advertising executive, says she stumbled on the story of the 17 other Americans as she was researching on Valaida Snow, a trumpet player who was arrested while touring Denmark in 1941 and intered in a Nazi concentration camp for two years. When Snow returned, it was she who referenced the Olympians, and from her research, Draper knew about the 17 other Americans.“We started with – I think there were 18 people, we don’t quite know their names, we have this photograph where we could see their faces,” Draper says. “So then there’s this process of investigation, finding out who they are – the accurate names, then finding the families, finding the school records, finding the university records, and going over to Germany where the records were very intact.”Draper had to personally dig through a variety of sources, including such leading black newspapers of the day – the Chicago Defender, Pittsburgh Courier, the Baltimore Afro-American, among others – and stories in Ebony as well as obituaries.The film includes Draper’s subtitled interview with a German spectator from the 1936 Olympics.Blair Underwood officially narrates the documentary and does double duty as executive producer. But the voices of the actual Olympians can be heard throughout the film, as well as the voices of some of their children who had to tell of the heartbreak their parents felt for having their great accomplishments largely ignored at home.In the interview Black Hollywood Lives’ Conversations, Draper says the film tells a story that is a vital part of history and is as relevant today as it was almost 80 years ago.“I was fascinated that the grandchildren of slaves would be able to go to Germany and represent America, and then we lose sight of the story, it disappears,” Draper says in the interview, seen on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5RZ8XtbN00U. “And I thought, wow, what would happen if all of these 18 young people were able to talk to young people of today and they were able to tell stories and create a pathway for the future, so that this next generation can understand what it feels like to break down stereotypes, what it feels like to kick in doors and do it in a way that’s really smart, really graceful, and a way that they can’t take it from you? These stories may be lost, but their impact lives forever. And I’m going to make sure that the story lives forever, too.“Olympic Pride, American Prejudice” opens at the Monica Film Center, 1332 2nd Street in Santa Monica, and plans to expand to 10 other cities in September.For more information on schedules, keep monitoring www.1936olympicsmovie.com.last_img read more

Short-handed Lakers end ‘frustrating’ trip with loss to Pistons

first_img“His competitive spirit is awesome,” Walton said of Kuzma. “His ankle’s banged up, I’m trying to get him less minutes, but he comes out there and he fights.”Two nights after scoring 15 points in the fourth quarter to carry the Lakers to a win, the rookie star finally got to perform for a hometown crowd. Chants of “Kuz” frequently broke out throughout the arena.“I treat every single game the same I think for the most part,” Kuzma said. “Of course when I’m at home it’s a little bit different. You kind of just block it out once the jump ball starts.” Lakers’ Kentavious Caldwell-Pope finds 3-point shot Big Baller, Ink: Over LaVar’s objections, Lonzo Ball gets tattoos in solidarity with brother LiAngelo It came with 2:44 left in the game, as the Lakers tried to climb out of a double-digit hole.“He was under control all game,” Walton said. “The ones he (was) hitting were good shots, which I think kind of shows how much he’s been working on his game. Those are shots he wasn’t even shooting earlier in the year.”Ball has not recorded a triple-double since Nov. 19, eight days after he became the youngest player in NBA history to do so. He was within two rebounds of the mark against the Grizzlies, finishing with 12 points and 10 assists.“The way I play, sometimes it happens, sometimes it doesn’t,” Ball said. “I do whatever I can to help the team win. … I like to play free. I don’t like looking at stats. I go out there and focus on the score.”Walton hoped to reduce his players’ minutes against the Pistons. Eleven players saw the floor, but with Isaiah Thomas away from the team to evaluate options for his balky hip, Ball still played 43 minutes and Kuzma logged nearly 41.Related Articles s Lakers’ Isaiah Thomas flies to New York to discuss treatment options for hip Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersTheir only win, ironically, came in comeback fashion against Memphis on Saturday. Facing the Pistons, the Lakers led 55-53 after the first half, but were outscored 28-21 in the third period and fell behind by as many as 12 points in the final quarter.“I knew we were going to get tired,” Coach Luke Walton said. “It’s been a long trip. We had our chances, give them credit. They hit shots down the stretch, we missed some good looks that we’ve been making, but I’m really proud of our group for the way that they fought all trip long with being down in numbers and playing.”Dynamic performances by the Lakers’ young stars went unrewarded. Kyle Kuzma, a native of nearby Flint, Mich., finished with 20 points and 11 rebounds, while Julius Randle scored 19 points in the second half to lead his team with 23 points and 11 boards of his own.But neither of them had a game quite as balanced as that of Lonzo Ball. The rookie point guard finished two rebounds shy of a triple-double for the second straight game, finishing with 15 points, 11 assists and eight rebounds.After shooting just 14.8 percent from 3-point range over his previous eight games, Ball made the only 3-pointer he attempted at the new Little Caesars Arena. PreviousLos Angeles Lakers head coach Luke Walton, left, talks with guard Lonzo Ball (2) during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Eric Moreland (24) shoots as Los Angeles Lakers forwards Channing Frye (12) and Travis Wear, rear, defend during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Blake Griffin (23) attempts to drive around Los Angeles Lakers guard Lonzo Ball (2) during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsDetroit Pistons guard Ish Smith (14) shoots as Los Angeles Lakers guard Tyler Ennis (10) defends during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Blake Griffin, right, pushes Los Angeles Lakers guard Lonzo Ball, left, on his drive to the basket during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Stanley Johnson (7) shoots over Los Angeles Lakers forward Julius Randle during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Pistons center Andre Drummond, left, and Lakers center Brook Lopez reach for a rebound during the first half of Monday’s game in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Lakers guard Lonzo Ball (2) prepares to pass around Detroit Pistons forward Anthony Tolliver during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Lakers forward Julius Randle (30) runs into the defense of Detroit Pistons forward Blake Griffin (23) during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Lakers guard Lonzo Ball prepares to pass around Pistons forward Anthony Tolliver during the second half of Monday’s game in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Lakers forward Julius Randle (30) shoots after being fouled by Detroit Pistons forward Blake Griffin (23) during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons center Andre Drummond (0) swats the ball away from Los Angeles Lakers forward Julius Randle (30) during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Anthony Tolliver, left, hugs former Pistons teammate Los Angeles Lakers guard Kentavious Caldwell-Pope after the NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons center Andre Drummond (0) fouls Los Angeles Lakers guard Kentavious Caldwell-Pope (1) during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Lakers guard Lonzo Ball drives during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons head coach Stan Van Gundy yells from the sidelines during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Lakers guard Lonzo Ball drives during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Lakers guard Kentavious Caldwell-Pope (1) drives during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Blake Griffin on the ground after fouling out during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons guard Reggie Jackson (1) reacts after a three-point basket during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Lakers forward Julius Randle shoots during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Blake Griffin talks to referee Nick Buchert after a foul during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Blake Griffin runs into Los Angeles Lakers guard Lonzo Ball during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Blake Griffin shoots during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Blake Griffin shoots during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Lakers head coach Luke Walton, front right, argues a call with referee Brett Nansel during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Lakers guard Lonzo Ball seen during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons guard Reggie Jackson takes the incoming ball during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Lakers head coach Luke Walton, left, talks with guard Lonzo Ball (2) during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Eric Moreland (24) shoots as Los Angeles Lakers forwards Channing Frye (12) and Travis Wear, rear, defend during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)NextShow Caption1 of 28Detroit Pistons forward Eric Moreland (24) shoots as Los Angeles Lakers forwards Channing Frye (12) and Travis Wear, rear, defend during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)ExpandDETROIT — For the third time in four games, the Lakers took a lead into halftime only to give up ground in the second half and have their night end in defeat.It happened in Indiana, New Orleans and, after losing 112-106 on Monday, in Detroit.“I think we’re really just frustrating ourselves,” center Brook Lopez said. “I know I am. We feel as a team we definitely can be better. They’re very winnable games, (with) all respect to the teams we played, we feel a lot of it’s on us.”The Lakers (32-41) will play eight of their final nine games at Staples Center, including a designated road game against the Clippers in the season finale. They returned home late Monday night after nine days on the road, having gone 1-3 on their final multi-game trip.last_img read more

Wellington Housing Authority is seeking applications for maintenance assistant

first_imgWellington Housing Authority aka Wheat Capitol Manor, is accepting applications for a Maintenance Assistant.  Position requires:  general maintenance knowledge, preparing apartments for lease up, and grounds upkeep.  Compatibility with the elderly and disabled a must.  Physically able to climb and lift.  Work under supervision of the Maintenance Supervisor.  A minimum of 3 years maintenance experience required.  Wage commensurate with experience.   Background check will be performed.  Benefits include KPERS, Health Insurance, vacation and accrued sick leave.  EOE.  For application/job description visit Wheat Capitol Manor, Wellington, Kansas; 620-326-5821.  [email protected] Applications accepted through Monday, Nov. 24last_img read more