American Sign Language Faculty – Adjunct

first_imgDescription*This recruitment is to establish an applicant pool for futurevacancies. Individuals will be contacted as vacanciesoccur.Olympic College is continuously recruiting for Adjunct Faculty toteach American Sign Language (ASL). The adjunct faculty will teachcourses in accordance with the college catalog, utilizingcurriculum developed by the full-time faculty in the discipline.Selected candidates may be asked to teach evening, distance(online, hybrid and/or Interactive Television (ITV)), and atsatellite campus when required.Olympic College seeks applicants who are dedicated tostudent-centered learning, closing achievement gaps, supportdiversity, and social justice learning opportunities, and whoemploy data-informed decision making in their instruction.Click the “How to Apply” button for more information.last_img read more

USDA says new Listeria rule has made a difference

first_imgDec 3, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – Most firms that produce ready-to-eat (RTE) meat and poultry products have taken specific steps to prevent Listeria contamination since new federal safety rules took effect last year, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced this week. The document says that in the first 9 months under the new regulations, 76% of the plants had no “noncompliance records,” or violation notices, while 24% had been notified of some type of violation. The report doesn’t describe what kinds of violations were most common. About 51% of all RTE plants are classified as “very small,” and these accounted for 56% of the Listeria-related rule violations. Jun 6, 2003, CIDRAP News story on announcement of interim final rule on Listeriahttp://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/fs/food-disease/news/june0503listeria.html The report says that FSIS has found Listeria contamination on about 1% or fewer of recent RTE product samples. However, it cites limited evidence from other sources that 3% to 5% of RTE meats from retail delicatessens—which are not regulated by the USDA—may harbor Listeria. The FSIS said it would accept comments on the report as well as on the Listeria rule itself until Jan 31, 2005. (See FSIS news release link below for details on how to submit comments.) The report also says that no firms have availed themselves of an option under the new rules to cite Listeria-control measures on their product labels. The provision was intended to give companies an incentive to install newer control technologies, with the idea that citing these measures on labels would confer a marketing advantage, FSIS spokesman Steven Cohen told CIDRAP News. The USDA does not regulate retail delis, which are under the jurisdiction of the FDA and state and local health departments, according to FSIS officials. But the report recommends that the FSIS should increase comparisons of the levels of Listeria on RTE products at production plants and at retail delis. The report suggests that retail delicatessens may be a soft spot in defenses against Listeria. “Evidence indicates that slicing and packaging of luncheon meats at retail deli counters presents a significant source of exposure to L. monocytogenes,” it states. “Prevalence reported from these sources ranges from 3 to 5 percent in deli meat sliced at retail.” But more studies are needed, because the samples that yielded the data were small, the report says. The data come from unpublished findings from New York State and one published study. Dec 1 FSIS news releasehttp://www.fsis.usda.gov/News_&_Events/NR_120104_01/index.asp “Under the Listeria rule, ready-to-eat meat and poultry products are safer and public health is being better protected,” Elsa Murano, USDA under secretary for food safety, said in a news release. “If progress continues at the current rate, we should achieve the Healthy People 2010 goal of lowering the incidence of listeriosis to 0.25 cases per 100,000 people.” However, close to a quarter of firms that produce RTE products, such as hot dogs and deli meats, failed to comply with some aspect of the new Listeria rules in the first 9 months after they took effect, according to the report by the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). Random testing of RTE products this year, including tests on the riskiest products, has shown Listeria on about 1% of samples or less, the report states. In general sampling, 3 of 345 samples collected in the first 5 months of this year tested positive for the pathogen. In testing of the highest-risk products over the same period, 11 of 1,349 samples tested positive. In October 2003 the FSIS added a requirement that firms take specific steps to prevent Listeria contamination of RTE foods. The rule says producers must choose one of three approaches: (1) using both a “post-lethality” (post-cooking) treatment, such as heating, and a chemical growth inhibitor; (2) using either a post-lethality treatment or a growth inhibitor; or (3) using sanitation only. Firms using sanitation only are supposed to get the most FSIS inspections and those using the first approach the fewest.center_img The team reports that more than 87% of the nearly 3,000 plants that produce RTE meats have adopted at least one Listeria-related measure since the regulations took effect in October 2003. About 17% of the plants began using a post-lethality treatment to control Listeria, and 27% began using an antimicrobial agent or “other control process” in one or more of their RTE products. Also, about 59% of the firms started testing for Listeria or similar organisms on food-contact surfaces after the rules took effect, the report says. Listeria monocytogenes can grow on refrigerated meat and cause serious illness in pregnant women, elderly people, and others with weak immune systems. Largely because of the risk of listeriosis, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) says these groups should not eat hot dogs or deli meats unless they are reheated, nor should they eat refrigerated meat spreads, refrigerated smoked seafood unless cooked, or products containing unpasteurized milk. See also: Full FSIS reporthttp://www.fsis.usda.gov/Oppde/rdad/frpubs/97-013F/LM_Assessment_Report_2004.pdf “This may be a way to differentiate their product from others,” Cohen said. “It’s a little early at this point to expect to see much of that. They would have to propose a label, and we’d evaluate it.” The new report was prepared by a 28-member FSIS team that was assigned to measure the effectiveness of all aspects of the Listeria regulations. The USDA began strengthening its Listeria rules for RTE meats in November 2002, after an outbreak in the Northeast involving at least 52 illness cases, seven deaths, and three miscarriages. That prompted the agency to require plants to start testing their surfaces and equipment for Listeria or else submit to increased testing by the FSIS. Previously the FSIS had tested RTE products but not plant equipment. In other items, the report says most of the small and very small plants producing RTE products didn’t receive or didn’t know about the FSIS compliance guidelines for the Listeria regulations. Cohen said he was confident that all the firms were aware of the regulations, since inspectors meet weekly with plant managers, but there may not have been “100% penetration on all the supporting materials that were available.” Nov 2002 CIDRAP News story on requirement that plants test environmental surfaces for Listeriahttp://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/fs/food-disease/news/listtests.html CIDRAP News story on recent FDA Listeria risk assessmenthttp://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/fs/food-disease/news/oct2103listeria.htmllast_img read more

Lady Cats Blanked By NC Lady Trojans

first_imgThe Wildcats bats didn’t make the long trip to New Castle on Thursday night as Franklin County fell to New Castle 10-0. The Wildcats were only able to muster 2 hits throughout the contest and also got two more runners on base via walks.Kelsie Patton threw a complete game for the Trojans and recorded 12 strikeouts in five innings pitched.The Wildcats two lone hits were from Morgan Bare and Camryn Brewer, both singles.Franklin County’s record now sits at 7-10 on the season.Courtesy of Wildcats Coach Alex McCool.last_img read more

Two USC alumni attend Archbishop Oscar Romero canonization ceremony

first_imgAlumni Edwin Juarez Rosales (left) and Sergio Avelar (right) attended Archbishop Oscar Romero’s beatification in May 2015. (Photo courtesy of Sergio Avelar)When Edwin Juarez Rosales and Sergio Avelar attended the beatification of Archbishop Oscar Romero in El Salvador in 2015, they were overwhelmed. The Salvadoran Catholic advocate for human rights would become a saint within their lifetime.Three years later, just as they had hoped, Pope Francis canonized Romero, drawing thousands of Catholics and Salvadorans to Vatican City — Juarez and Avelar among them. At 4 a.m. on Oct. 14, the morning of the canonization, the two USC alumni lined up outside St. Peter’s Square in anticipation of the moment when Romero, Pope Paul VI and five others would officially be elevated to sainthood.“For the honor of the Blessed Trinity, the exaltation of the Catholic faith and the increase of the Christian life…” Pope Francis said in Latin as he recited the canonization formula and addressed the tens of thousands who gathered in St. Peter’s Square later that morning.Juarez and Avelar stood in white and blue among the crowd, overcome by prayer and emotion as they heard Romero’s story recounted and reflected on the life of the martyr who was shot in 1980 by the military government while giving mass in San Salvador.During his life, Romero advocated for the people of El Salvador. He stood against the violence in his country and denounced the persecution of those around him, despite fear for his safety. Following his death and years of stalling, Romero is now a saint, 38 years later. “There’s always a moment in which it hits you — that you are there at this historical place in this moment in history that will not repeat,” Juarez said. “I mean, the first saint from my country was being proclaimed and acknowledged as someone that the whole world should look up to.”Both Juarez and Avelar grew up learning about Romero and his teachings. Juarez’s parents attended his funeral mass in 1980 and encountered the vocation of social justice through his homilies and actions, Juarez said. As Salvadoran Catholics, both Juarez and Avelar consider Romero part of their identity.“Being [at the canonization, there’s] this sense of pride that, to be honest, you don’t always feel as an immigrant in the United States from El Salvador,” said Juarez, who came to the U.S. from El Salvador at age 18. “My country is not on the news for these kinds of things … being there for something that is just good … We can say, yes, this guy — he’s also from El Salvador just like me. He’s receiving the highest honor a person can receive.”Juarez and Avelar began searching for flights immediately after the Vatican announced the canonization in May. Months later, they arrived in Rome from Los Angeles the Saturday afternoon before the canonization. Throughout Rome, rosaries, stamps, magnets and other trinkets imprinted with the face of Romero lined the streets and shops, Avelar said.“I think this brings a lot of hope,” he said. “At the time that Romero was assassinated, it was a dark time in the country’s history. After that, the civil war started and then now the country’s facing similar types of violence because of gangs … This brings some light of hope that the violence can hopefully be stopped again and there can be peace brought to the country.”The day after the canonization, Juarez and Avelar attended a mass held in thanksgiving by members of the church and cardinals, bishops and priests from El Salvador, after which the pope greeted those in attendance. Though fewer Salvadorans were able to attend the canonization in Vatican City than the beatification in San Salvador, Avelar said he was proud that it took place at the universal church, demonstrating Romero’s lasting impact on more than El Salvador.“Everyone knows about him, knows who he was, knows what he stood for, what he believed,” he said. “Many people now, even who aren’t Catholic — he sort of just transcends outside of Catholic circles …. He did what he could to stand up for basic human rights, especially for the poor people. That transcends religion, race and all these other labels.”last_img read more

Short-handed Lakers end ‘frustrating’ trip with loss to Pistons

first_img“His competitive spirit is awesome,” Walton said of Kuzma. “His ankle’s banged up, I’m trying to get him less minutes, but he comes out there and he fights.”Two nights after scoring 15 points in the fourth quarter to carry the Lakers to a win, the rookie star finally got to perform for a hometown crowd. Chants of “Kuz” frequently broke out throughout the arena.“I treat every single game the same I think for the most part,” Kuzma said. “Of course when I’m at home it’s a little bit different. You kind of just block it out once the jump ball starts.” Lakers’ Kentavious Caldwell-Pope finds 3-point shot Big Baller, Ink: Over LaVar’s objections, Lonzo Ball gets tattoos in solidarity with brother LiAngelo It came with 2:44 left in the game, as the Lakers tried to climb out of a double-digit hole.“He was under control all game,” Walton said. “The ones he (was) hitting were good shots, which I think kind of shows how much he’s been working on his game. Those are shots he wasn’t even shooting earlier in the year.”Ball has not recorded a triple-double since Nov. 19, eight days after he became the youngest player in NBA history to do so. He was within two rebounds of the mark against the Grizzlies, finishing with 12 points and 10 assists.“The way I play, sometimes it happens, sometimes it doesn’t,” Ball said. “I do whatever I can to help the team win. … I like to play free. I don’t like looking at stats. I go out there and focus on the score.”Walton hoped to reduce his players’ minutes against the Pistons. Eleven players saw the floor, but with Isaiah Thomas away from the team to evaluate options for his balky hip, Ball still played 43 minutes and Kuzma logged nearly 41.Related Articles s Lakers’ Isaiah Thomas flies to New York to discuss treatment options for hip Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersTheir only win, ironically, came in comeback fashion against Memphis on Saturday. Facing the Pistons, the Lakers led 55-53 after the first half, but were outscored 28-21 in the third period and fell behind by as many as 12 points in the final quarter.“I knew we were going to get tired,” Coach Luke Walton said. “It’s been a long trip. We had our chances, give them credit. They hit shots down the stretch, we missed some good looks that we’ve been making, but I’m really proud of our group for the way that they fought all trip long with being down in numbers and playing.”Dynamic performances by the Lakers’ young stars went unrewarded. Kyle Kuzma, a native of nearby Flint, Mich., finished with 20 points and 11 rebounds, while Julius Randle scored 19 points in the second half to lead his team with 23 points and 11 boards of his own.But neither of them had a game quite as balanced as that of Lonzo Ball. The rookie point guard finished two rebounds shy of a triple-double for the second straight game, finishing with 15 points, 11 assists and eight rebounds.After shooting just 14.8 percent from 3-point range over his previous eight games, Ball made the only 3-pointer he attempted at the new Little Caesars Arena. PreviousLos Angeles Lakers head coach Luke Walton, left, talks with guard Lonzo Ball (2) during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Eric Moreland (24) shoots as Los Angeles Lakers forwards Channing Frye (12) and Travis Wear, rear, defend during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Blake Griffin (23) attempts to drive around Los Angeles Lakers guard Lonzo Ball (2) during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsDetroit Pistons guard Ish Smith (14) shoots as Los Angeles Lakers guard Tyler Ennis (10) defends during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Blake Griffin, right, pushes Los Angeles Lakers guard Lonzo Ball, left, on his drive to the basket during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Stanley Johnson (7) shoots over Los Angeles Lakers forward Julius Randle during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Pistons center Andre Drummond, left, and Lakers center Brook Lopez reach for a rebound during the first half of Monday’s game in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Lakers guard Lonzo Ball (2) prepares to pass around Detroit Pistons forward Anthony Tolliver during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Lakers forward Julius Randle (30) runs into the defense of Detroit Pistons forward Blake Griffin (23) during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Lakers guard Lonzo Ball prepares to pass around Pistons forward Anthony Tolliver during the second half of Monday’s game in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Lakers forward Julius Randle (30) shoots after being fouled by Detroit Pistons forward Blake Griffin (23) during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons center Andre Drummond (0) swats the ball away from Los Angeles Lakers forward Julius Randle (30) during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Anthony Tolliver, left, hugs former Pistons teammate Los Angeles Lakers guard Kentavious Caldwell-Pope after the NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons center Andre Drummond (0) fouls Los Angeles Lakers guard Kentavious Caldwell-Pope (1) during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Lakers guard Lonzo Ball drives during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons head coach Stan Van Gundy yells from the sidelines during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Lakers guard Lonzo Ball drives during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Lakers guard Kentavious Caldwell-Pope (1) drives during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Blake Griffin on the ground after fouling out during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons guard Reggie Jackson (1) reacts after a three-point basket during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Lakers forward Julius Randle shoots during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Blake Griffin talks to referee Nick Buchert after a foul during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Blake Griffin runs into Los Angeles Lakers guard Lonzo Ball during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Blake Griffin shoots during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Blake Griffin shoots during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Lakers head coach Luke Walton, front right, argues a call with referee Brett Nansel during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Lakers guard Lonzo Ball seen during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons guard Reggie Jackson takes the incoming ball during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Lakers, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Los Angeles Lakers head coach Luke Walton, left, talks with guard Lonzo Ball (2) during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Detroit Pistons, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)Detroit Pistons forward Eric Moreland (24) shoots as Los Angeles Lakers forwards Channing Frye (12) and Travis Wear, rear, defend during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)NextShow Caption1 of 28Detroit Pistons forward Eric Moreland (24) shoots as Los Angeles Lakers forwards Channing Frye (12) and Travis Wear, rear, defend during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, March 26, 2018, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)ExpandDETROIT — For the third time in four games, the Lakers took a lead into halftime only to give up ground in the second half and have their night end in defeat.It happened in Indiana, New Orleans and, after losing 112-106 on Monday, in Detroit.“I think we’re really just frustrating ourselves,” center Brook Lopez said. “I know I am. We feel as a team we definitely can be better. They’re very winnable games, (with) all respect to the teams we played, we feel a lot of it’s on us.”The Lakers (32-41) will play eight of their final nine games at Staples Center, including a designated road game against the Clippers in the season finale. They returned home late Monday night after nine days on the road, having gone 1-3 on their final multi-game trip.last_img read more