All about dignity

first_imgEmail Print AS YOUNG women, the Magdalens were stripped of their freedom, their dignity and even their names. They lost parents, children, siblings. Many of them were barely past childhood and some were still children but they were forced to endure a punishing regime of hard physical labour, verbal and physical punishments that could only be described as abuse and many had no idea when, or if, this living hell would open and release them.The vast majority were paid nothing for their work. And the McAleese report has revealed that the state had a hand in condemning about one-quarter of these women to this fate.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up While they were incarcerated in the laundries, they learned plenty about how to remove filth from dirty linen and how to iron and mend. But they got no other education or training and girls as young as twelve left their schoolbooks behind them forever when the doors of the laundry closed behind them.Some spent all their lives in these grim places but those who got out no doubt found there was no reward waiting for women who had no skills that would earn them anything other than minimum pay, if that.Having endured all that, the majority of the survivors are now elderly and are again reliant on the state to pay them a pension, often non-contributory and barely enough to exist. Certainly, not an amount that will give them choices about how to spend their golden years.In contrast, the civil servants who had a hand in condemning them to the laundries and a subsequent lifetime of nightmare memories retired on gilt-edged pensions that are more than enough to pay for golf club memberships and sun-drenched holidays.Certainly, the Magdalene women need an apology. But before even more of them end their days without some comforts, they need to be promptly and properly compensated.Above: A tombstone memorial to Magdalene laundry workers from the Good Shepherd Convent in Limerick. NewsLocal NewsAll about dignityBy admin – February 7, 2013 402 Twitter Linkedincenter_img WhatsApp Facebook Advertisement Previous articleFather on trial for sexual assault of family membersNext article“Opportunistic” Limerick woman alleges payoff for silence adminlast_img read more

Abuse of older people an epidemic in NZ society

first_imgNZ Herald 13 June 2015Elder abuse is rife in New Zealand society and half of all instances seen by Age Concern involve financial abuse. As many as one in 10 older people may be victims of financial elder abuse, research suggests.Monday marks the beginning of the 10th annual Elder Abuse Awareness Week. It’s a shock to discover how little humanity some Kiwis have when it comes to the older generation.“We consider it unacceptable to hit our children and we also need to consider it unacceptable to abuse our elders,” says Robyn Scott, Age Concern’s chief executive.“We don’t think about the way we speak about older people and we don’t think about their rights.”Some people think because someone is old it doesn’t matter what happens to them any more or they don’t need money to spend, she says.We all need to keep an eye out for elder abuse. “Don’t let fear of meddling in someone else’s business stop you from voicing your concern. It is time to stop elder abuse in our communities,” says Scott.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=11464389last_img read more