Further deferral on sale of Cecil Street site

first_imgPrint The property on Cecil Street which was at the centre of a debate at Monday’s council meeting.Photo: Cian ReinhardtFORMER Mayor James Collins has compared a move by Limerick City and County Council to further delay a decision to sell three council-owned properties to that of a “dictatorship”.The disposal of 36 Cecil Street to Tait House Community Enterprise, along with a proposal for a second site at Galvone Industrial Estate to the community development co-operative were this week deferred for a fourth time since July.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The site at 36 Cecil Street is currently home to The Gaff — an artist-led, community-focused facility in the heart of the city.The disposal of another site at Galvone Industrial Estate to Limerick City Build was also further postponed at this Monday’s council.Mayor Michael Sheahan told council members that the items were to be deferred so the Council could look at all “possibilities”.“This will give the executive more time to discuss it and report back to the Metropolitan District,” the Fine Gael politician explained.Fianna Fáil councillor James Collins insisted on being allowed to discuss the items at Monday’s meeting and pointed out that the item had been proposed and seconded.“You are trying to silence us. You won’t even allow us speak on the matter,” Cllr Collins fumed.“It has been moved back to the Metropolitan District with a commitment from the executive to look at all possibilities,” Mayor Sheahan replied.“There are members here from The Gaff in the public gallery who want to know what’s happening,” Cllr Collins concluded. Email Facebook Advertisement NewsBusinessCommunityPoliticsFurther deferral on sale of Cecil Street siteBy Alan Jacques – November 28, 2019 490 center_img WhatsApp Twitter Linkedin Previous articleChild waiting list a ‘thundering disgrace’Next articleLimerick Post Show | Not Around Us Campaign Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ielast_img read more

Estancia mayor’s office robbed

first_imgJob hire employee Jency Dela Cruz discovered the burglary around 11:30 a.m. on June 15, a police report showed.   ILOILO City – Unidentified robbers barged into the mayor’s office of Estancia, Iloilo. Two internet modems, a closed circuit television camera and P700 cash went missing. They have yet to identify the suspects as of this writing./PN Police believed the suspects gained entry through the comfort room at the back of the municipal hall.  last_img

First-gen mentorship program provides support system for students

first_imgPhoto courtesy of Gina IbrahimAs the number of first generation college students grows on campus, the First Generation Mentorship Program seeks to provide assistance and resources to this expanding niche of students. For this year’s freshmen class, 16 percent are first generation — a 3 percent increase from last year — and as USC seeks to diversify and offer opportunities for students from all backgrounds, this number should increase in the coming years. Founded in 2008, the First Generation Mentorship Program aims to help students who may lack guidance or preparation for college by pairing them with alumni who were also first generation students.“We really focus on professional development, so we do our best to pair students with alumni who work in their career fields,” said Gina Ibrahim, USC’s internship and diversity programs adviser. “We find that the basis of the program is having that common ground of understanding what it was like to be at USC as a first generation student and finding out what resources are available to you.”  The program is open to all first generation students, and they are encouraged to apply after having completed a full academic semester at USC. On average, the program fluctuated between 25 to 30 mentors each year. This year, the program saw a surge of some 60 mentors applying, 40 of which were accepted after meeting the required criteria. Ibrahim notes an especially large increase in the number of Viterbi alumni applying for this year’s program. For the 2015-2016 school year, the program had four Viterbi alumni, and this year 19 will participate. Employer relations and research director Jennifer Kim said she hopes the increase in interested mentors will lead to an increase in applications.“You would think everyone would be interested, but it’s difficult to explain why more students don’t apply,” Kim said. “Otherwise, we would definitely try to grow the program.” The program is targeted towards students’ professional goals and their intended career paths, exposing them to a mentor and a role model who can guide their development.“As a first generation student, sometimes it’s a little harder to find a support system or to find the resources that are available to you on campus because you’re the first person in your family to go to college,” Ibrahim said. “Your parents or your older siblings might not have the information that you were seeking.” The goal of the program is to form an organic mentor-mentee bond between alumni and students, Kim said. The Career Center also hosts monthly events between October and April that discuss resume building, networking and interviewing. “We try to balance [the program] out by having some formal programming so everyone has sort of the same experience,” Kim said. “We’re hoping that organically they choose to meet up outside, to speak on the phone…We’re hoping that it just grows into a friendship, a mentorship.” Mentors are asked to attend the monthly group meetings as well as put in extra effort to either speak or meet with their mentee throughout the academic year. “We do ask a lot of [the mentors],” Kim said. “They’re really accommodating to the students…They’re going out of their way to physically be here [on campus] and to meet with them outside of the formal program.” Currently, 13 percent of the USC undergraduate student body is first generation, according to the University. “I think students sometimes don’t understand the value in having a mentor, and this is a good way to test the waters,” Kim said. “Then you can see the importance of a mentor-mentee relationship and what impact that can have on your academics, your personal life, your professional life.”last_img read more