Pensioner charged over alleged child sexual assault

first_imgNewsBreaking newsPensioner charged over alleged child sexual assaultBy admin – January 15, 2014 664 Twitter WhatsApp Linkedin Advertisement Andrew CareyA LIMERICK pensioner has been charged with sexually assaulting a young boy between 2006 and 2007.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Michael O’Brien aged 73 and with an address at High Meadows, Gouldavoher, Dooradoyle is charged with sexually assaulting the boy between January 1, 2006 and March 31, 2007.It is alleged that he engaged in a sexual act on nine occasions with the child who is aged under 15.An application for Mr O’Brien’s name not be mentioned in media reports was refused by Judge O’Kelly who said that the alleged injured party was not a relative of the accused.He was released on his own bail to appear at Limerick District Court on March 28 and ordered not to have any contact with the alleged injured party.center_img Facebook Email Print Previous articleFundraising concert for the Roche familyNext articleDeenihan was aware of City of Culture problems adminlast_img read more

Indian industries feel the heat

first_img Comments are closed. Facedwith fierce competition, Indian companies in pursuit of skilled talent arechanging their recruitment practices. Paran Balakrishnan reports Itwas a peculiarly Indian corporate custom. In the old days, firms that wereowned by businessmen from the Marwari caste always made sure that their topexecutives were trusted lieutenants from the same caste. Similarly, it alwayshelped to be a Parsi in a company owned by Parsi businessmen. Thereare still traces of caste-oriented nepotism in the Indian corporate world butit is rapidly being swept aside by a gigantic tidal wave of competition.Companies that would once have appointed a loyal clansman are now more likelyto call in a headhunter. “We hire people from companies where the serviceorientation is high and who are used to an aggressive market environment,”says Preetha Chatterjee, vice-president HR at Delhi-based mobile phone companyBharti Cellular.Competitionis fierce and it is changing the recruitment practices of Indian companiesfaster than you can say “hire the best”. Take Chennai-based MurugappaIndustries, an old-style conglomerate that makes everything from sweets toindustrial products. A few weeks ago Murugappa Industries was a hot topic. Itschairman MV Subbiah, a member of the family that holds the controlling stake inthe group, stepped down in favour of a computer industry executive who wasbrought in from outside. A year ago Murugappa brought in a team of managementteachers and respected professionals on to a newly formed executive board.”They wanted to change the company’s culture from top to bottom,”says a management consultant. Indianindustry is feeling the heat from competition and that explains why it isdropping old nepotistic practices faster than the proverbial hot brick. Today,even the oldest business houses have called in consultants and startedrestructuring their entire operations. New executives – frequently frommultinationals – have been brought in to turn family-run corporations intoleaner, meaner enterprises. Whythe sudden turnaround? Back in the 1980s the Indian government used its powersto see that competition was kept to a minimum. It constructed a strict systemof licensing that ensured, for instance, that only three car manufacturers wereallowed to operate. Competition was deemed to be wasteful and a frittering awayof “national resources”. Foreign companies were discouraged frominvesting in India. Theshackles were lifted in 1991 and Indian industry has altered beyond recognitionsince then. For example, the world’s top car manufacturers includingMercedes-Benz, Honda, Toyota and GM are falling over themselves to get afoothold in the region. Some of the weaker players like Daewoo and Fiat are alreadybeing pushed out. In short: competition is brutal and tough. Theopening of the Indian economy has created businesses where none existed before– and a huge demand for trained and talented executives. This year theinsurance market has been opened to foreign companies and a flood of new giantslike Prudential have entered the country for the first time. A few years agoforeign liquor companies like United Distillers began selling their wares here.Others, such as Bacardi, have entered the market more recently. Addon the high-tech revolution. The advent of mobile telephony has createdfast-moving new players like Bharti Cellular, which are fighting amulti-pronged battle against formidable rivals. And IT companies likeBangalore-based Infosys are snaring the best talent with their bonanza offersof share options. Ascompetition has intensified during the 1990s, India has begun to look more likethe rest of the world. International headhunters like Egon Zehnder andKorn/Ferry have established offices and are frequently called in by companiesthat are about to make a foray into India. Some of these consultancies havebegun operations in neighbouring countries like Sri Lanka, which began openingits economy in the early 1980s. However, it must be noted that because of itsearlier move to economic liberalisation, Sri Lanka hasn’t faced a sudden influxof foreign companies as India did in the 1990s. Similarly, while Pakistan isgrowing, it is doing so at a much slower pace than India. Howdo newcomers to India go about hiring the best executives for their operations?The answer is that they call in consultants like McKinsey or headhunters likeEgon Zehnder, who are tasked with finding chief executives. Lower-levelexecutives are traced through a mixture of placement companies and newspaperadvertising.  Takethe example of Bharti Telecom, a relatively unknown telecoms company until afew years ago. It had a tough time initially but hiring became easier after itlinked up with BT. More recently, Bharti has become an established brand in themarket place. Says Chatterjee: “I think the ability to attract talent iscorrelated with success in the market place.” Ofcourse, filling the executive ranks isn’t the whole story for new conglomeratesshifting to the subcontinent. India has a Byzantine maze of labour regulationsthat makes it extremely difficult for firms to hire and fire workers. Thatmeans that newly arrived companies must tread carefully when they take theirfirst steps in India. Again countries like Sri Lanka have a less-complex mazeof regulations. Thechanges that have taken place during the 1990s can be seen at the annualrecruitment jamboree at the Indian Institute of Management in Ahmedabad. Tenyears ago, consumer giants like Nestl‚ and Hindustan Lever (the Indian arm ofUnilever) called the shots and hired all the best talent from the Institute.Now, they have been pushed to the sidelines.Thenew favourites at the Indian Institute are other international heavyweightslike McKinsey and Lehman Bros, and they are now scooping up the smarteststudents from India’s top management school for their global operations. Orthere are the domestic superstars like Infosys Technologies and other high-techcompanies that are luring talent with the promise of a bumper bonanza of stockoptions. This year Lehman Bros hired nine students from the Institute, and mosthave already moved to the bank’s London office. Whatfurther changes are still to come in the recruitment game? One thing is forcertain – competition will ensure that companies turn towards the best.Furtherinformation…Formore information see the following Websites:www.egonzehnder.comwww.mckinsey.com Indian industries feel the heatOn 1 Jun 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

Yorkshire sisters-in-law are PING champions

first_img The other prize winners were: Nicky Iles and Catherine Grief (Crondon Park, Essex) with 40pts, on countback from Rita Bleasdale and Elizabeth Sturrock (Gt Yarmouth & Caister, Norfolk); 39pts Coleen and Harriet Painter (Brocton Hall, Staffordshire). Yorkshire sisters-in-law are PING champions The championship finals also offer the players the chance to visit PING’s European Custom Fitting Centre and to take part in competitions. The putting competition was won by Nicky Iles and the ‘find your yardage’ challenge by Gillian Creed (Olton, Warwickshire.) They pipped Bedfordshire teenagers Luca Thompson and Imogen Morton King on countback, thanks to their better back nine of 22 points.  They pipped Bedfordshire teenagers Luca Thompson and Imogen Morton King on countback, thanks to their better back nine of 22 points.  Caption : Tina Sampson (left) and Kerry Lamb (image copyright Leadboard Photography). Tags: Gainsborough Golf Club, PING, Yorkshire Kerry was comfortably below her handicap, starting with a birdie three on the 1st and adding another on the 14th, while Tina played her part. “I had a few rough holes, but I expect to off my handicap, and I knew I would come in on a few holes,” she said.  This was a first national final for the pair and Kerry commented: “We are so proud, we’ve been talking about it for weeks and getting on everyone’s nerves.” Tina went on: “When you think of all the thousands of women who entered and that we were in the top 50, it’s amazing and we bore everyone!”  “It’s just amazing,” said Kerry, a 10-handicapper. “It’s the best thing that’s ever happened to me, other than having my kids!” Tina, who plays off 27, added: “We are really, really chuffed.” Imogen, an 11-handicapper and club champion, is a Girls Golf Rocks ambassador in Bedfordshire, encouraging other girls to play golf as part of the project run by England Golf and the Golf Foundation. Tomorrow, she and two other ambassadors will make up a county team in the pro-am of the Bridgestone Challenge pro-am at Luton Hoo.  5 Sep 2017 Yorkshire sisters-in-law are PING champions The tournament – which is run by England Golf – attracted entries from 16,610 women from 885 clubs and the best qualifying score was 53 points. The top 50 pairs nationwide qualified for today’s Grand Final, and the next 50 played in yesterday’s Plate Final.  The pair, from Tankersley Park, Sheffield, arrived on the tee with caddies wearing named bibs – and then put on a show to match, amassing 42 points in tough conditions on the Karsten Lakes course.  Dave Fanning, marketing director for PING Europe remarked: “It’s 12 years since we came up with the concept of a ladies’ championship which was inclusive of all standards of golfer. With the full enthusiasm of England Golf we are able to put on a great event and the 16,000+ people who play each year are testament to how popular it is.”  Yorkshire sisters-in-law Kerry Lamb and Tina Sampson put on the championship style and won the PING women’s fourball betterball Grand Final on countback in the rain at Gainsborough Golf Club. Kerry was comfortably below her handicap, starting with a birdie three on the 1st and adding another on the 14th, while Tina played her part. “I had a few rough holes, but I expect to off my handicap, and I knew I would come in on a few holes,” she said.  The other prize winners were: Nicky Iles and Catherine Grief (Crondon Park, Essex) with 40pts, on countback from Rita Bleasdale and Elizabeth Sturrock (Gt Yarmouth & Caister, Norfolk); 39pts Coleen and Harriet Painter (Brocton Hall, Staffordshire). The tournament – which is run by England Golf – attracted entries from 16,610 women from 885 clubs and the best qualifying score was 53 points. The top 50 pairs nationwide qualified for today’s Grand Final, and the next 50 played in yesterday’s Plate Final.  “It’s such a good event,” said Luca, who has been playing golf for 18 months and has a 13 handicap. “England Golf events are so different, they really feel like a championship.” She reached the national final of the Bridgestone Chase Your Dream Trophy which was played during the recent England Golf Week.  Dave Fanning, marketing director for PING Europe remarked: “It’s 12 years since we came up with the concept of a ladies’ championship which was inclusive of all standards of golfer. With the full enthusiasm of England Golf we are able to put on a great event and the 16,000+ people who play each year are testament to how popular it is.”  “It’s just amazing,” said Kerry, a 10-handicapper. “It’s the best thing that’s ever happened to me, other than having my kids!” Tina, who plays off 27, added: “We are really, really chuffed.” This was a first national final for the pair and Kerry commented: “We are so proud, we’ve been talking about it for weeks and getting on everyone’s nerves.” Tina went on: “When you think of all the thousands of women who entered and that we were in the top 50, it’s amazing and we bore everyone!”  The championship finals also offer the players the chance to visit PING’s European Custom Fitting Centre and to take part in competitions. The putting competition was won by Nicky Iles and the ‘find your yardage’ challenge by Gillian Creed (Olton, Warwickshire.) Runners-up Luca, 15, and Imogen, 16, (Pavenham Park) started very strongly and their betterball score was one-over par after nine holes and they had amassed 22 points by the turn. But although they scored well on the inward half it wasn’t quite enough to win and they confessed to a mixture of disappointment and pleasure.  “It’s such a good event,” said Luca, who has been playing golf for 18 months and has a 13 handicap. “England Golf events are so different, they really feel like a championship.” She reached the national final of the Bridgestone Chase Your Dream Trophy which was played during the recent England Golf Week.  Runners-up Luca, 15, and Imogen, 16, (Pavenham Park) started very strongly and their betterball score was one-over par after nine holes and they had amassed 22 points by the turn. But although they scored well on the inward half it wasn’t quite enough to win and they confessed to a mixture of disappointment and pleasure.  Imogen, an 11-handicapper and club champion, is a Girls Golf Rocks ambassador in Bedfordshire, encouraging other girls to play golf as part of the project run by England Golf and the Golf Foundation. Tomorrow, she and two other ambassadors will make up a county team in the pro-am of the Bridgestone Challenge pro-am at Luton Hoo.  Third place, on 41 points, went to another Yorkshire pair, Kath Tate and Terri Williamson of Bedale Golf Club, who also played in last year’s Grand Final. Then, Kath wasn’t very well and although they managed to finish mid-table, they were determined to return this year. “We really wanted to enjoy the day, it’s a fantastic occasion and something you can really look forward to, it’s special for us.”  Third place, on 41 points, went to another Yorkshire pair, Kath Tate and Terri Williamson of Bedale Golf Club, who also played in last year’s Grand Final. Then, Kath wasn’t very well and although they managed to finish mid-table, they were determined to return this year. “We really wanted to enjoy the day, it’s a fantastic occasion and something you can really look forward to, it’s special for us.”  Kerry and Tina play together regularly, they know each other’s game inside out, they’re both very competitive – and it proved to be a winning combination. Click here for full scores  Yorkshire sisters-in-law Kerry Lamb and Tina Sampson put on the championship style and won the PING women’s fourball betterball Grand Final on countback in the rain at Gainsborough Golf Club. The pair, from Tankersley Park, Sheffield, arrived on the tee with caddies wearing named bibs – and then put on a show to match, amassing 42 points in tough conditions on the Karsten Lakes course.  Click here for full scores  Kerry and Tina play together regularly, they know each other’s game inside out, they’re both very competitive – and it proved to be a winning combination.last_img read more