Football’s dominance to wane by next World Cup

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter 6th July 2018 | By Joanne Christie Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Tags: Online Gambling Finance Football is set to account for a whopping 63.1% of all sports betting this year thanks to the World Cup, but things will be different by the time the next one rolls around, according to H2 Gambling Capital.The leading gambling data business says the biggest changes in the market in the next four years will come from developments in China and the US.“The FIFA World Cup is the biggest single event for all operators at 5.0% of all global sports betting,  but the make-up of the market is set to change markedly between the 2018 to 2022 tournaments.“The US sports betting effect and the upswing you get in Chinese Sports Lottery betting during the event will see China become the largest World Cup betting market by Qatar 2022,” says David Henwood, co-director at H2.As the below dashboard shows, China has already overtaken the UK in terms of the total size of its sports betting market, but the US is set for strong growth following the repeal of PASPA, which means individual states can legalise sports betting.The US market is expected to be huge, but given football is less popular in the US than in Europe — H2 predicts it will account for only about 5-6% of the US regulated market — the addition of US gross win to the global pie will reduce football’s share of the market.“The interesting trend to watch going forward will be the undoubted growth in US sports (American football, baseball, basketball, ice hockey), already at 11% of the global pie in 2018, and set to eat further into football’s dominance over the next four years,” says Henwood.China’s impact on the market will be somewhat different – H2 says while mobile and in-play betting are set to become stronger on a global basis, the growth in China Sports Lottery betting will offset some of this growth as typically its bets are placed pre-match and using land-based facilities.Nonetheless, Henwood says in terms of the World Cup specifically, “76% of all Russia 2018 betting will be on mobile, growing to some 89% by Qatar 2022”.H2 Gambling Capital is the gambling industry’s leading consulting, market intelligence and data team. The company has a track record of 15 years focused on the global gambling industry, its projections have been influential in shaping legislators’  and investors’ views of the gambling sector across the globe. Topics: Finance Sports betting Football’s dominance to wane by next World Cup The beautiful game is set to account for 63.1% of all sports betting this year thanks to the World Cup, but things will be different by the time the next one rolls around, according to H2 Gambling Capital Regions: Asia Europe US Email Addresslast_img read more

Digital Sports Tech sets industry-first with NCAA prop betting

first_img Sports betting solutions provider Digital Sports Tech (DST) has launched what it says is the first player prop betting offering for US National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) events. Digital Sports Tech sets industry-first with NCAA prop betting Sports betting Email Address Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Regions: UScenter_img Topics: Sports betting Tech & innovation AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Sports betting solutions provider Digital Sports Tech (DST) has launched what it says is the first player prop betting offering for US National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) events.Available via DST’s Props Data Feed and Props Builder products, NCAA Player Props covers all regular-season basketball and American football contests and bowl games, as well as the March Madness basketball tournament that began yesterday (March 19).Sportsbook customers can use the service to wager on any player’s statistical performance, including total points, assists and rebounds in basketball, as well as passing, rushing and receiving yards in American football.Operators that use the new service can offer up to 200 individual markets per match.“College sports are hugely popular with bettors who closely follow US sports, and March Madness, in particular, attracts the attention of millions all looking to place a wager during this mouth-watering tournament,” DST executive director Ari Lewski said.“We’re giving our partners the opportunity to provide a market-leading NCAA offering to their users with our comprehensive coverage of player props markets across not only March Madness but all the top college basketball and football matches going forward.”The launch comes after DST in December rolled out its first NCAA offering, which has allowed punters to wager on traditional markets across collegiate sporting events.Image: Phil Roeder 20th March 2019 | By contenteditorlast_img read more

Regulatory reflections on Germany and the Netherlands

first_img KPMG’s latest Malta Gaming eSummit looked at the changing regulatory landscape in Germany and the Netherlands – and its implications for gaming operatives. Dr Alan Littler, along with Claus Hambach and Dr Wulf Hambach, partners of specialist law firm Hambach & Hambach, and Justin Franssen, partner of Kalff, Katz and Franssen, reflect on the issues raised during their panel session at the eSummit. Tags: Mobile Online Gambling OTB and Betting Shops Casino & games With regards to the tax situation in Germany, state lotteries and politicians who want to maintain the status quo of a strict online gambling ban continue to claim that unregulated online-gambling operators do not pay tax in Germany. However, according to estimates, it appears these “illegal” online gambling operators have paid approximately €2bn in German sportsbetting tax and approximately €1bn in German VAT so far.Nevertheless, German states are currently intensifying enforcement measures against these operators. If the gambling authorities are finally successful they would cut a billion euro cash flow as well. The panel noted that proper regulation goes hand-in-hand with proper taxation and vice versa.Dutch progress In the Netherlands, it is widely known that the introduction of legislation to enable the licensing of remote gambling is proving to be a drawn out process. The Remote Gaming Bill has been pending before the Senate since 2016.Last September, the Ministry of Justice & Security ran a consultation process on the draft decree. Contrary to expectations, further secondary legislation was not published for consultation. Unusually, the Senate had posed a third round of written questions on the Bill; two is the norm. These were answered by the Ministry shortly before Christmas but nothing particularly new was revealed.Since the KPMG Malta Gaming eSummit took place in November 2018, the situation has evolved considerably. The bill was subject to a two-part plenary debate before the Senate in February 2019, with the plenary vote taking place on Tuesday 19th February. The government was able to command 44 of the 75 seats in favour of the Bill. However, this does not mean that the licensing process will open immediately, and neither was it without some political bargaining.An ongoing bone of contention during parliamentary discourse has been how the ‘Bouwmeester motion’ will be implemented. This motion, passed by the House of Representatives in September 2011, calls for those parties which have been unlawfully present on the market to be refused a licence in due course.  Two amendments were tabled before the Senate, one calling for a five year cooling off period before such operators can enter the market, the other calling for such a period to last for two years.The motion calling for two years passed, and whilst the details remain to be seen, the cooling off period will require operators not to have any presence on the Dutch market but without going as far as a blackout.Furthermore, those operators who have not had a locally unlicensed presence on the Dutch market (incumbent land-based parties, but also some remote operators who have refrained from serving customers in the Netherlands) will be able to enter the market prior to those which have had such a presence.As things appear the cooling off period may also enable those operators which have been sanctioned by the Gambling Authority to enter the market. The Gambling Authority will publish policy rules on this matter, prior to summer 2019, for consultation.A number of other consultation processes are also in the pipeline for this year, including on the Gambling Authority’s guidance on giving effect to the duty of care and another by the Ministry of Justice & Security on the draft ministerial regulations for remote games of chance, which will follow that which took place in autumn 2018 on the draft decree.On the basis of information currently to hand, we expect the amendments to the Wet op de kansspelen (Betting & Gaming Act) to take effect on 1 July 2020 and for the licensing process to open on that date or shortly thereafter.Generally, the latter half of 2018 saw an increase in enforcement in the Netherlands. Until June 2017, the Gambling Authority’s approach to enforcement against unlicensed operators was based on three prioritisation criteria. The situation became somewhat more vague with the introduction of further criteria and recent sanction decisions for a locally unlicensed presence on the market have been triggered by factors which, a couple of years ago, would not have resulted in enforcement measures being sought.With regards to taxation, Dutch residents are required to pay tax on winnings from remote games of chance when the operator is based abroad. However, this does not apply to poker and online casino games offered from within the EU.Once operators offer services under locally-awarded licences, players will only remain liable for gambling tax themselves should they continue to play with locally unlicensed operators.Currently, the rate of taxation is 30.1% across varying bases for the incumbents. Following the passage of the Remote Gaming Bill, the rate will fall back to its original 29%; this will be the rate applicable to locally-licensed remote operations. Remote operators will be taxed at a rate of 29% GGR. It is possible that, a few years after the remote gambling regime is up and running, the tax rate could be reduced by up to 4% but this will require a legislative amendment.Several incumbents only pay tax on prizes exceeding €449, including those offering land-based sports and horserace betting. To avoid state aid complications once the remote market opens, the threshold will cease to apply for such betting operations.  Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter KPMG’s latest Malta Gaming eSummit looked at the changing regulatory landscape in Germany and the Netherlands – and its implications for gaming operatives. Dr Alan Littler, along with Claus Hambach and Dr Wulf Hambach, partners of specialist law firm Hambach & Hambach, and Justin Franssen, partner of Kalff, Katz and Franssen, reflect on the issues raised during their panel session at the eSummit.Starting with Germany, it was agreed the country’s online gambling market is highly complex from regulatory, legal and tax viewpoints. The panel considered that new online gambling regulation, due to be enacted in 2021 and including casino, poker, sports betting and perhaps other verticals such as betting on eSports, offered a promising perspective.Authorities in Schleswig-Holstein might re-establish and enforce regulation of the online casino market. However, enforcement and payment blocking in particular are currently used on the basis of a federal administrative court decision prohibiting online casino.The panel also highlighted that, from 2019 onwards, a new white list for online gambling operators might be established and this had been recently discussed by regulatory decision makers in Germany. 9th April 2019 | By contenteditorcenter_img Regulatory reflections on Germany and the Netherlands AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Regions: Europe Central and Eastern Europe Western Europe Germany Netherlands Topics: Casino & games Legal & compliance Sports betting Email Addresslast_img read more

NY betting bill amended to permit in-stadium wagering

first_img Some of New York’s sporting arenas could be able to offer betting to patrons, after legislation to legalise land-based and mobile betting was amended by authors, Senator Joseph Addabbo and Assemblymember Gary Pretlow. Email Address Regions: US New York Tags: Mobile Online Gambling OTB and Betting Shops Race Track and Racino Some of New York’s sporting arenas could be able to offer betting to patrons, after legislation to legalise land-based and mobile betting was amended by authors, Senator Joseph Addabbo and Assemblymember Gary Pretlow. Addabbo’s bill, S17, and Pretlow’s companion bill in the New York Assembly A6113 were amended yesterday (June 6) to significantly expand the outlets at which betting would be legal, should it pass into law.Both off-track betting (OTB) locations and New York Racing Association (NYRA) facilities would be allowed to offer mobile wagering via kiosks, per the amendment. These would be allowed to launch betting alongside New York State’s four upstate casinos. Facilities hosting video lottery terminals and racinos, however, would only be allowed to launch sports betting 12 months after the vertical goes live at the casinos, OTBs and NYRA outlets. The bill’s definition of affiliates to licensed sports betting operators has been amended to include sports arenas. This means casinos could partner stadia to offer sports betting. However, this would only be permitted if the county in which the stadium is located does not have an existing affiliate, such as an OTB, franchised gambling outlet, racetrack or VLT facility. Under these terms Madison Square Gardens on Manhattan, which has already trademarked is brand for gambling purposes, would be eligible. Read the full story on iGB North America. 7th June 2019 | By contenteditor Topics: Casino & games Legal & compliance Sports betting Horse racing NY betting bill amended to permit in-stadium wagering AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Casino & games Subscribe to the iGaming newsletterlast_img read more

FDJ secures regulatory approval for November IPO

first_img French gaming operator La Française des Jeux (FDJ) has secured approval from the country’s stock market regulator to proceed with its initial public offering (IPO), in a move that marks the first step towards the privatisation of the business. Finance French gaming operator La Française des Jeux (FDJ) has secured approval from the country’s stock market regulator to proceed with its initial public offering (IPO), in a move that marks the first step towards the privatisation of the business.The Autorité des marchés financiers (AMF) signed off on FDJ’s registration document, with trading expected to commence on November 21 after the price range for FDJ shares is published on November 6.Plans to sell off the majority of the French state’s 72% stake in FDJ through an IPO have been in the offing since October 2018, when the country’s parliament approved the move.The IPO is expected to take place on the Euronext market in Paris, although the transaction still remains subject to other regulatory approvals from the AMF.“This privatisation project marks the start of a new chapter in the history of our company,” FDJ chief executive Stéphane Pallez said. “With its strong economic model supported by innovation, the group will pursue a balanced growth strategy, combining economic performance, responsible gaming and social commitments.“Our ambition is to strengthen our position as the leading operator of lottery and sports betting in France, and to become a leading international player in the gaming and services sector.”The Agence des Participations de l’Etat (APE), the state agency that handles the privatisation of state assets, in July selected a consortium of banks led by BNP Paribas, Citi, Goldman Sachs and Société Générale to serve as coordinators for the institutional share sale.Earlier this month, France also introduced new gambling regulations, including the creation of a new national gambling authority, L’autorité nationale des jeux (ANJ) to replace current regulator, l’Autorité nationale de régulation des jeux en ligne (ARJEL), ahead of the privatisation.Shortly after this announcement, FDJ published its financial results for the first nine months of 2019, the operator reporting a 7% year-on-year rise in revenue after experiencing a rise in stakes across all of its business units.Revenue for the nine months through to 30 September amounted to €1.42bn (£1.23bn/$1.58bn), up from €1.33bn in the corresponding period last year.In a statement confirming the IPO approval, FDJ said that it expects full-year revenue to amount to approximately €1.9bn, with lottery turnover to come in at over €1.55bn. Sports betting looks set to turn a revenue of €370m, with sales from adjacent businesses bringing in around €50m.For 2020, FDJ said it hopes to grow turnover by 5%, with a 5% year-on-year rise in lottery revenue and 6% increase in sports betting revenue expected.Image: Quinn Dombrowski Tags: Online Gambling FDJ secures regulatory approval for November IPO Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Topics: Finance Legal & compliance Lottery Sports betting Strategy AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter 21st October 2019 | By contenteditor Regions: Europe Western Europe France Email Addresslast_img read more

Panther’s Reign by Quickspin

first_img Email Address Welcome to the jungle! Panther’s Reign will take you on a once-in-a-lifetime adventure to the Amazon, a lush and vibrant paradise. Spin your way through this tropical forest and soak up the sounds of the flowing river, exotic birds and gentle breeze. Keep an eye out for colourful parrots, cheeky monkeys and shiny gemstones along the way. And the king of the jungle – the elusive black panther. Casino & games AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter 13th March 2020 | By Aaron Noy Topics: Casino & games Slots Panther’s Reign by Quickspin Welcome to the jungle! Panther’s Reign will take you on a once-in-a-lifetime adventure to the Amazon, a lush and vibrant paradise.Spin your way through this tropical forest and soak up the sounds of the flowing river, exotic birds and gentle breeze. Keep an eye out for colourful parrots, cheeky monkeys and shiny gemstones along the way. And the king of the jungle – the elusive black panther.You can play a demo of this slot here! Subscribe to the iGaming newsletterlast_img read more

Seeking truth in the upcoming data battle

first_imgSports betting 12th March 2020 | By Stephen Carter AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Regions: UK & Ireland Email Address Following last week’s news that the simmering dispute around data rights for English and Scottish football is now headed to the UK competition court, Scott Longley runs the rule over the main arguments set to be aired during proceedingsSome of the arguments that will likely soon be heard by the UK’s Competition Appeal Tribunal from, on the one hand, Sportradar and, on the other, Football DataCo and Betgenius, were aired earlier this year at a conference hosted, appropriately enough, in the offices of a law firm.The news last week the two sides are heading to court brought the simmering dispute around access to the data for English and Scottish league football out into the open.The Sportradar statement spoke of its “reluctance” to go the legal route and added that it remained “open to the possibility of finding a resolution.”However, as was evident from the panel at the CMS Law conference in London in January, there is evidently some distance between the two sides on what constitutes a competitive marketplace for sports data.The panel featured two of the participants in the upcoming court case: Adrian Ford, the general manager at FDC and David Lampitt from Sportradar as well as two other data supplier representatives, Andrew Ashenden from Stats Perform (the previous incumbent for English and Scottish football) and Michael Short from IMG Arena.“Official data is the truth,” Ford told the audience. “Unofficial data may or may not agree with official data; it may or may not be right. But the reality is official is the truth and therefore it is what goes out to the wider world and in the case of betting, it is what bets should be settled on.“Otherwise,” he went on “there is a consumer risk, and it should be said that not all unofficial data is up to the standard represented on this panel. There is a consumer risk; there is an integrity risk.”One truth versus multiplicity in data The line of argument about ‘one truth’ in data appears to have been imported from the world of information systems where, Wikipedia usefully informs us, “incorrectly linked duplicate or de-normalized data elements… pose a risk for retrieval of outdated, and therefore incorrect, information.”Such issues apply with, for instance, electronic health records. But with sport? Not so much. Indeed, as anyone who has followed the sorry tale of the English Premier League’s introduction of VAR this season will attest, the idea of one truth sits uneasily with the subjectivity involved in a lot of decisions on the field.It is one reason why, in the words of one betting-data source, the argument about ‘one truth’ in the case of English and Scottish football “falls flat.”Indeed, as it stands Football DataCo currently has two separate deals for betting and media up and running; one with Betgenius for betting and the other with Stats Perform’s Opta for media. So that’s two sources of truth and when you add in the various other sources, either scouted or off-tube, there is in fact a plethora of ‘sources of truth’.Further, bookmakers have been sourcing live data, either themselves or through data-supply companies, for a long time, and certainly long before sports decided they wanted a slice of the action via official data deals. The suggestion, therefore, that operators can’t manage their risks without a single source of truth official data product is somewhat fanciful.To restrict the supply of data sources, then, would be to drastically affect the way the trading rooms operate. “From a trading perspective if I am going to turn over tens of millions on an in-play market it would make sense to me to have as many eyes as possible on (the game),” said another source at a betting-data and odds provider.“To receive a single source of truth makes no sense to me and I will ultimately source parallel measures to make sure the integrity of the data is sound.”Chosen paths Ford admitted on stage in January that the tender last year mentioned multiple official collectors as one option. “We looked at other routes that other people on this panel are aware of,” he said.Indeed, since he spoke it has been announced that the European Leagues, representing 16 leagues across the continent, have opted for just such a multiple approach, signing a deal with all the of the major providers, Sportradar, Betgenius and Stats Perform.In announcing the deal, Jacco Swart, managing director for the European Leagues, said the partnership with all three firms “captures one of the key aims of the European Leagues when it comes to providing valuable and innovative services to our member leagues.”He added, moreover, that with more leagues having signed up to the new deal than previously was the case it was “the best proof that this approach functions.”Indeed, even Betgenius appeared to endorse the multi-provider approach.In its own press release announcing its involvement in this joint venture, Steve Burton, managing director at Betgenius, said: “Each of the leagues included in this agreement has control over how their data is collected and distributed, affording vital visibility to safeguard their competitions.”These comments appear to directly contradict those from Ford at the CMS conference about one source of truth being necessary for integrity. All of which leaves us pondering the real reason for the pursuing the exclusive route.For that, we need look no further than the press release which originally announced the new deal between FDC and Betgenius where Ford said the deal would “maximise the value of live data in the betting market for the leagues”.In other words, they would henceforth be charging more for the data. Indeed, the clear implication from the ‘one truth’ argument is that the leagues wish for the betting data for their sport to become more expensive for operators.While this isn’t existential for the top-tier operators, that might not necessarily be the case for those further down the ladder where the costs keep mounting while the wider business environment continues to get more challenging.Or as Sportradar said last week, the new arrangements are “not only harmful to data supply companies like Sportradar, but also to the downstream market (bookmakers and their customers) where product choice is being restricted or removed in favour of an information monopoly.”There are reasons why competition authorities don’t like monopolies – and yet this is exactly what Ford, FDC and Betgenius are arguing for by citing the one source of truth argument. It is up to the courts now to decide whether they should get their way.Scott Longley has been a journalist since the early 2000s, covering personal finance, sport and gambling. He has worked for a number of publications including Investment Week, Bloomberg Money, Football First., eGaming Review and Gambling Compliance. Scott now runs his own editorial consultancy, Clear Concise Media, and writes for a number of online and print titles. Seeking truth in the upcoming data battle Following last week’s news that the simmering dispute around data rights for English and Scottish football is now headed to the UK competition court, Scott Longley runs the rule over the main arguments set to be aired during proceedings Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Topics: Sports betting Strategy Tags: Online Gamblinglast_img read more

ICE Asia goes digital after in-person event postponed

first_img ICE Asia goes digital after in-person event postponed ICE Asia will follow Clarion Gaming’s ICE North America in becoming a digital show in 2020, after the in-person event scheduled for June this year was shifted to May 2021. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Topics: People Strategy Regions: Asia ICE Asia will follow Clarion Gaming’s ICE North America in becoming a digital show in 2020, after the in-person event scheduled for June this year was shifted to May 2021.With the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic making face-to-face meetings impossible, Clarion Gaming and SiGMA have launched ICE-SiGMA Asia Digital. This will be an online-only event that runs from 8-10 June, when the event was originally scheduled to take place in Manila.It will be comprised of three days of content focused on gaming in Asia, incorporating local operators, thought leaders and industry experts. Topics to be discussed include technological innovation, the future of gaming, and how the market can recover once the pandemic subsides.It will feature a series of panel discussions and keynote presentations, as well as employing an online networking platform to allow attendees and participants to hold meetings and make connections via video.The physical event, meanwhile, has been rescheduled for 27-28 May, 2021.“My team and I continue to empathise with our global gaming community, as well as industries and supply chains around the world, that are being affected by Covid-19,” Clarion Gaming managing director Kate Chambers said.“We understand the deep impact the virus continues to have with our friends and colleagues across the Asia region and globally, and our best wishes go out to them.“These are unprecedented times and we would like to keep our communication channels open and understand the challenges unfolding across the Asian gaming community.  If we can help in any way, I would be delighted to hear from the industry on my personal email: [email protected]”SiGMA Group founder and chief executive Eman Pulis added that Covid-19 had provided “a unique opportunity to rethink how we live and work”.“In line with SiGMA Group’s commitment to facilitating new business opportunities for key players in the global igaming and emerging tech sectors, the digital conference will embrace the difficulties we are facing at a time when working together has never been more important,” he explained.More information on the event, as well as a registration form for ICE-SiGMA Asia DIGITAL, from 8 to 10 June 2020, can be found here.The shift to digital for the Asian event comes after ICE North America Digital was announced last month. Running from 11 to 15 May, this event will see three hours of content broadcast daily, featuring some of the leading operators, executives and suppliers in the market.ICE North America, meanwhile, has been rescheduled for Spring 2021 in New Orleans.center_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter 7th April 2020 | By contenteditor People Email Addresslast_img read more

Eldorado Resorts swings to Q1 loss amid Covid-19 shut-down

first_img12th May 2020 | By contenteditor Casino & games Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Casino operator Eldorado Resorts posted a $175.6m net loss for the first quarter of 2019 after a strong start to the period was hindered by the closure of its venues as a result of the novel coronavirus (Covid-19).Eldorado chief executive Tom Reeg explained that the business had enjoyed a very strong start to the year, with revenue for the first two months up 6.6% year-on-year, and earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation (EBITDA) up 24.7%.“However, the strength in January and February was offset by Covid-19 related weakness due to the mandated closure of all our properties by March 18, 2020,” Reeg said. “As a result, Eldorado generated first quarter same-store net revenues of $473.1m and EBITDA of $102.5m, down 17.5% and 33.0% year over year, respectively.”On a like-for-like basis, revenue for the three months to 31 March would have been down 25.6%, though this fell to 17.5% after the contributions of five properties divested during the prior year were removed.Read the full story on iGB North America. Topics: Casino & games Financecenter_img Casino operator Eldorado Resorts posted a $175.6m net loss for the first quarter of 2019 after a strong start to the period was hindered by the closure of its venues as a result of the novel coronavirus (Covid-19). Eldorado Resorts swings to Q1 loss amid Covid-19 shut-down Regions: US Email Addresslast_img read more

iGB Live! Online: Day two round-up

first_img Tags: Online Gambling Email Address iGB Live! Online: Day two round-up Legal & compliance Topics: Legal & compliance Marketing & affiliates People Strategy The focus of the second day of iGB Live! Online shifted to B2B, with speakers including H2 Gambling Capital’s Ed Birkin, SKS365 chief Alexander Martin and Better Collective CEO Jesper Søgaard.The day began with H2’s Ed Birkin analysing the impact of novel coronavirus (Covid-19) on the sports betting vertical.While a full run-down of that session is available here, Birkin revealed that iGB’s principal data partner forecasts a 10% decline of interactive betting gross revenue from H2’s pre-pandemic forecasts for the year. This decline is likely to be more pronounced for land-based as a result of shop and casino closures, with revenue for the channel now expected to come in 30% below original projections.Birkin noted that there is a significant difference between sports betting and horse racing activity. Some form of horse racing activity continued throughout the lockdown, often behind closed doors, and therefore interactive racing GGR is only down 4% compared to H2’s initial forecast, whereas interactive sports betting GGR is down 16%.For the nascent US market, he said that while there had been a pronounced impact in March – at a time when the National Collegiate Athletics Association’s (NCAA) March Madness basketball tournament usually takes place – the effects since were less severe. April, May, June and July are traditionally quieter months in the US sporting calendar, which means the impact has been a lot lower than it otherwise might have been.When the National Football League (NFL) season kicks off in September, H2 still expects there to be some impact from the pandemic, as the size and scale of the market is constantly changing as state after state regulates the vertical, this will still allow for strong year-on-year growth.“We couldn’t hand them a Playstation” In a session titled, ‘The consumer response: retail and live sports shutdown’, Ivan Liashenko (pictured), chief marketing officer at Parimatch, discussed methods of retaining existing customers and keeping them engaged during the lockdown period.Liashenko said the main problem Parimatch faced was finding a way to ensure its customers would come back to the site even when there were almost no live sports on offer.“Of course, just like everyone else, we weren’t fully ready for what happened, but we tried to do our best,” Liashenko said. “The first problem we faced was customer retention. When there’s no sports events it’s hard to make players stay.”However, the Parimatch CMO said that matches played on popular video game Fifa proved to be an effective retention tool as customers enjoyed the familiarity offered by playing as real teams. “We work with local influencers in all of our countries and we tried to ask some celebrities to play,” he said. “We took some football players from big football clubs, which was a bit of a problem because they were of course in quarantine. We couldn’t hand them a Playstation, we had to leave it at the door and we couldn’t help install it.”Esports, he said, also kept customers coming back and have held steady in popularity even as traditional sports return.Liashenko added that producing a regular podcast helped too, as not only did this provide a reason for customers to visit the Parimatch website, but it also provided bettors more of a sense of community.“It’s just 7-10 minutes and kept customers up to date about our betting offering and importantly let our customers know that other people were betting too,” Liashenko continued. “When you’re all on your own it’s easy to think ‘Nobody else is watching these matches; nobody else is betting’ but we tried to recreate the atmosphere of a betting shop through podcasts.”Lessons learned from Italy Next up was Alexander Martin, CEO of SKS365, who recounted how lockdown impacted business in Italy, as well as sharing how he believed it would shape the operator’s future.The first point Martin covered was how the ongoing pandemic impacted SKS365 and its brand, Planetwin365, which runs around 1,000 betting shops in Italy.Due to the large scale outbreak in northern Italy, Martin explained that the company had a first glimpse at what was to come in lockdown. Initially, the impact of the Italian government announcing the closure of all shops on March 8 was limited, with only a decline of 40% in turnover. By the second week, however, the estate saw a 70% decline.As a result, igaming then saw significant growth in Italy – Martin noted that total GGR was 20% up year-on-year across all operators, primarily driven by online casinos. Conversely, sportsbook GGR was down 50%.SKS365 actively continued to invest in products, as well as customer and people experience, Martin continued. The company continued to grow its online casino product, and enriched its live dealer offering. By offering table games broadcasted from land-based casinos, Martin explained they were able to emulate a live, land-based experience.“All improvements resulted in the steady growth of casino, even during the lockdown, and achieved a year-on-year uplift on our online casino GGR of more than 50%,” he said.Despite retail outlets remaining closed, Martin said the company had continued to invest in betting shops, adding essential measures to allow them to be active as soon as possible.He then rounded off the session with his view of the future, and what the lasting impacts will be from the pandemic.A study in Italy saw 10% of its land-based customers opening an online gambling account for the first time, he noted.“That is something certainly that will be continuing, and online will [represent] a bigger percentage of the overall gambling market in the future,” Martin said.With the future uncertain, he goes on to recommend continued investment in areas less impacted by social distancing, such as esports and virtual gaming, as well as those with social opportunities: “As we have seen a revival in poker, we will continue to offer product formats that allow physical distancing, but enable social gatherings – including games that include chats, voice and even video interactions between players.”Finally, he said, SKS365 will continue to invest in its omnichannel strategy, highlighting the importance of the customer’s ability to play in a format best suited to their personal preference and environment.The importance of a light touch The day’s content concluded with Better Collective chief executive Jesper Søgaard discussing the value of licensing in the affiliate sector. He said a model similar to those in New Jersey or Romania, designed to give operators legal certainty over who they work with, and to ensure regulators have oversight of who is active in a territory, would be preferable.While Søgaard admitted to some dissatisfaction with elements of the New Jersey model – outlined in full here – he said that ultimately affiliate licensing appeared to increasingly inevitable as regulations tightened in European jurisdictions.This, he argued, made it vital for affiliates to be in dialogue with regulators, in order to play a role in shaping regulations rather than being hit with restrictive and unviable controls.iGB Live! Online is now finished, but all sessions are available to watch on demand. Register here to re-watch the two days’ content.The physical event is also coming up, taking place at the RAI in Amsterdam over 22 to 25 September.center_img The focus of the second day of iGB Live! Online shifted to B2B, with speakers including H2 Gambling Capital’s Ed Birkin, SKS365 chief Alexander Martin and Better Collective CEO Jesper Søgaard. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter 16th July 2020 | By contenteditorlast_img read more