Having asthma as a player won’t hold you back

first_imgIt’s important to get the right medication, as evidence suggests that if asthma remains untreated it can cause ongoing changes to a person’s lungs, which can cause problems later in life.Dr Falvey says…– Everyone involved in a winter sport should be screened for asthma– Exercise-induced asthma is different to baseline asthma– You may be asthmatic, even if you’ve never had any symptoms– Don’t leave asthma untreated – it can damage your lungsThis article appeared in the October 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here.For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Rugby asthmatics: (from left) Al Kellock, Ben Gollings and Cian HealyHaving asthma doesn’t mean you can’t be as fit as the next athlete. Ireland team doctor Eanna Falvey gives you the low-downBaseline asthma can be related to an allergy to pollen or dust, whereas exercise-induced asthma is brought on by highly intense physical activity, especially in cold weather. So, everyone involved in winter sports should be screened for exercise-induced asthma to get the correct treatment.It’s commonly thought that asthma sufferers experience problems getting enough air into their lungs, but in fact they’re unable to get the air out. They then can’t get the next breath in, so feel short of breath.To test if someone is asthmatic, we measure their forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), or how much air someone can move in one second. If there is a drop of 10% or more in that figure after exercise, they have exercise-induced asthma.All sports players subject to World Anti-Doping Association (WADA) drugs tests need to undergo testing to obtain evidence and confirmation from a doctor that they’re asthmatic before they can legally take medication.Normally testing involves running on treadmills, but at the IRFU we devised a rugby-specific challenge. As rugby players have to use their upper limbs, chest and back, our challenge involved using a weighted medicine ball that players had to pass against a wall, bounce, and jump and run with, interspersed with 20-metre sprints to mimic a game-type situation. Everyone had their lung function tested before and after the exercise, and we examined how it had changed to decide whether or not treatment was required.One player at the peak of his fitness was found to be asthmatic despite having experienced no symptoms. Following treatment, he had a fantastic following season, and we’d like to think we had some effect on this!last_img read more

Australia boss Michael Cheika defends Craig Joubert

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Australia coach Michael Cheika expresses surprise at the lack of support given to Craig Joubert by World Rugby World Rugby said a scrum would have been the correct call. Cheika was angered at World Rugby’s review saying that they only chose to cover the one controversial decision from the match, rather than being a review of all tight calls from the weekend’s matches.He also felt that Joubert has had no support from his own bosses.Cheika said: “I genuinely feel for Craig Joubert. It’s so unfair. No other referee has had this stuff put out there like that and he’s a very good referee,“I would have liked my mates to back me up a little more on the odd occasion, if you know what I mean. I feel for him.“We talk about having the right principles in the game and all of that.“Genuinely I have never seen that before. I am not sure why that decision had to be publicly reviewed and put out there. Scotland went out of the World Cup in heartbreaking fashion, as they led 34-32 with 90 seconds to go but a late controversial Bernard Foley penalty sent the Wallabies into the semis. Referee Craig Joubert called a deliberate offside when replays seemed to indicate the ball had come off a Wallaby player. The contentious decision has left a bitter taste in the mouths of Scottish players and fans.However Australia coach Michael Cheika has come to the defence of Joubert and has criticised World Rugby for reviewing the call and publicly announcing that his match-deciding 80th minute penalty should not have been awarded to Australia. Michael Cheika defends under-fire referee Craig Joubert. Photo: Getty Images Joubert has been lambasted from all quarters of the game with former World Cup winner Matt Dawson calling him a “disgrace” for failing to shake Scottish players hands after the final whistle. “I really hope his fellow referees stand by him because – well, the fact I’m not allowed to say much about it says it all.”Craig Joubert sprints off the pitch after the final whistle during match between Australia and Scotland. Photo: David Rogers/Getty ImagesCheika added that this was not the most surprising call of the World Cup and even speculated that Scotland were fortunate to qualify for the knockout round at the expense of Japan. He felt that the important try scored by the Scots in the must-win match against Samoa had an element doubt about it.He said: “I don’t know if Samoa are making a list about the little knock-on before Scotland scored at the end, or how many more we are going to send in,”He added: “It’s a bit surprising because no other decision in the tournament’s been reviewed,”“I felt we should have had a couple of scrum penalties before. I don’t know if they are reviewing those or if there is a document coming out from World Rugby on them. If there is then we’ll make a list.”He also said that now was not the moment to review the use of the TMO system.He said: “If we go to the TMO for every decision… the first game of the World Cup lasted almost two hours and the TMOs were lambasted,“If we check everything we might kick-off on a Saturday afternoon and finish sometime Sunday evening. It just can’t happen.”For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

Exeter v Gloucester live stream: How to watch from anywhere

first_imgCan’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. We recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing.  Don’t miss a moment of the action from Sandy Park where Exeter take on Gloucester. Exeter v Gloucester live stream: How to watch from anywhereOne of the key matches to keep an eye on this week in the Gallagher Premiership is Exeter’s upcoming contest with Gloucester. The last time the two sides faced each other was back in February and despite a scoreline of 26-15 which suggests an imperious victory for the Chiefs, it was indeed a lot closer than those numbers suggest.It was an excellent game of rugby with the high-point coming with a sublime try from Stuart Hogg who danced his way past the Gloucester defence. Of course a week previously he famously dropped the ball on the line for Scotland against Ireland, so this time he made sure of the five points. That’s because BT Sport has a contract-free monthly pass that allows you to get instant access to all four of their sport channels for just £25.That’s great value given they are showing every Premiership match played behind closed doors live and will also be covering the European Champions and Challenge Cup knockout stages in September and October. Plus, you can cancel at any time because there’s no contract.Get a BT Sport Monthly PassIf you’re from the UK but are overseas when Exeter v Gloucester takes place, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – see the information above.Exeter v Gloucester live stream: How to watch from the USAIf you live in the States, the official broadcaster of Premiership matches is NBC, with matches streamed on NBC Sports Gold so you can watch them anytime and anywhere.Exeter v Gloucester will kick off at 12.30pm EST and 9.30am on the West Coast.The NBC Sports Gold Pass for rugby is $79.99 and includes coverage of the Gallagher Premiership, European Champions and Challenge Cups, and Guinness Six Nations.Exeter v Gloucester live stream: How to watch from AustraliaFor those in Australia, Fox Sports have the rights to show Premiership matches and you can watch Exeter v Gloucester at 1.55am on Thursday (AEST).The Foxtel Sports HD bundle is $74 a month – and you get 50+ other channels as well as Foxtel GO so you can watch when on the move.Foxtel Sports HD bundle LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Difference maker: Hogg scored a pivotal try during Exeter’s last match with Gloucester (Getty Images) Credit: Getty Images Exeter v Gloucester live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIt’s little wonder that Sky Sport NZ, with ten sports channels, including one dedicated to rugby, is the rights-holder for Premiership matches in New Zealand.If you want to tune in to Exeter v Gloucester from the Land of the Long White Cloud, the match kicks off at 4.30am on Thursday morning on Sky Sport 2.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99) but if you sign up for 12 months before 30 September 2020 you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offer Exeter v Gloucester live stream: How to watch from the UKExeter v Gloucester, which kicks off at 5.30pm on Wednesday, will be shown live on the BT Sport app. If you don’t have a BT contract but want to watch the match, don’t worry because you can still easily watch it online. Gloucester face a tough task to get revenge on that past result though. Since the restart the Chiefs have not lost a match although the cherry and whites have won their last two matches by large margins.We could be in for an end-to-end, exciting affair then at Sandy Park.Exeter: Stuart Hogg, Jack Nowell, Henry Slade, Tom Hendrickson, Ian Whitten, Joe Simmonds (captain), Jack Maunder, Ben Moon, Luke Cowan-Dickie, Harry Williams, Jonny Gray, Jonny Hill, Dave Ewers, Jacques Vermeulen, Sam SimmondsReplacements: Jack Yeandle, Alec Hepburn, Tomas Francis, Sam Skinner, Jannes Kirsten, Sam Hidalgo-Clyne, Gareth Steenson, Ollie DevotoGloucester: Tom Hudson, Charlie Sharples, Henry Trinder, Tom Seabrook, Matt Banahan, Billy Twelvetrees (captain), Charlie Chapman, Corne Fourie, Henry Walker, Jamal Ford-Robinson, Charlie Beckett, Danny Drake, Josh Gray, Jordy Reid, Ruan AckermannReplacements: Todd Gleave, Alex Seville, Ciaran Knight, Cameron Jordan, Will Crane, Joe Simpson, George Barton, Alex MorganHere’s how to find a reliable live stream for Exeter v Gloucester wherever you are.How to watch Exeter v Gloucester from outside your countryIf you’re abroad, but still want to watch your local Premiership coverage, like Exeter v Gloucester, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network.VPNs allow you to get around any geo-blocking by changing your IP address so you appear in a different location and can watch the same legal Premiership live stream you would at home.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPN and recommend ExpressVPN, which is easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs.Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free.Check out ExpressVPNlast_img read more

Edinburgh v Ospreys live stream: How to watch from anywhere

first_img Edinburgh v Ospreys live stream: How to watch from anywhereThe last Guinness Pro14 match to take place this weekend will see Edinburgh take on the Ospreys.Edinburgh will look to build on a positive 2019/20 campaign under Richard Cockerill which saw the Scottish capital side finish at the summit of Conference B. They may have lost to Ulster in the semi-finals, but the side as a whole is trending in the right direction it seems. Whereas Ospreys last year struggled as they only won two matches in the Pro14 last term but they will look to get off to a better start this season.Below is the team news;Edinburgh: Damien Hoyland, Darcy Graham, Mark Bennett, Chris Dean, Jamie Farndale, Jaco van der Walt, Charlie Shiel; Pierre Schoeman, Stuart McInally (captain), Simon Berghan, Ben Toolis, Grant Gilchrist, Magnus Bradbury, Luke Crosbie, Nick Haining.Replacements: David Cherry, Jamie Bhatti, WP Nel, Andrew Davidson, Hamish Watson, Dan Nutton, Nathan Chamberlain, George Taylor.Ospreys: Dan Evans, Mat Protheroe, Owen Watkin, Keiran Williams, Luke Morgan, Stephen Myler, Rhys Webb; Nicky Smith, Sam Parry, Tom Botha, Adam Beard, Alun Wyn Jones, Olly Cracknell, Justin Tipuric (captain), Morgan Morris.Replacements: Dewi Lake, Rhodri Jones, Ma’afu Fia, Bradley Davies, Dan Lydiate, Reuben Morgan-Williams, Josh Thomas, Tiaan Thomas-Wheeler.If you want to watch this second Guinness Pro14 semi-final wherever you are, we explain how to find a reliable live stream for Edinburgh v Ospreys.How to watch Edinburgh v Ospreys from outside your countryIf you’re abroad but still want to watch your local Pro14 coverage, like Edinburgh v Ospreys this Saturday, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network.VPNs allow you to get around any geo-blocking by changing your IP address so you appear in a different location and can watch the same legal Premiership live stream you would at home.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPN and recommend ExpressVPN, which is easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs. We recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing.  Edinburgh v Ospreys live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIf you want to tune in to Edinburgh v Ospreys from New Zealand, the match kicks off at 6.30am on Sunday morning on Sky Sport NZ 1.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99) but if you sign up for 12 months before 30 September 2020 you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offer Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free.Check out ExpressVPN Edinburgh v Ospreys live stream: How to watch from the UKEdinburgh v Ospreys, which kicks off at 7.35pm tonight, will be shown live on Premier Sports 1 in the UK.Premier Sports show every Guinness Pro14 match live in the UK. If you have a Sky or Virgin Media contract, you can add Premier Sports to your package from £9.99 a month.Or subscribe to Premier Player so you can stream matches online from £9.99 a month or £99 for 12 months, which would include the 2020-21 Pro14 season too. That starts on 3 October.See Premier Sports offersIf you’re from the UK but are overseas when there’s a particular match you want to watch, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – see the information above.Edinburgh v Ospreys live stream: How to watch from EuropeIf you’re in Austria, Germany, Italy or Switzerland, you can watch Edinburgh v Ospreys (8.35pm kick-off) through the live and on-demand streaming service DAZN. It’s compatible with smart TVs and phones, tablets, PCs, streaming sticks, set-top boxes, gaming consoles and more.Edinburgh v Ospreys live stream: How to watch from CanadaDAZN, which allows you to live stream sport or watch it on demand, is the place to go to see Edinburgh v Ospreys in Canada. It will kick off at 2.35pm EST and 11.35am on the West Coast.Find out more about DAZN herecenter_img Here are all the details on how you can watch Edinburgh’s match against the Ospreys. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

El Consejo Ejecutivo pide oración y discernimiento después de los…

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Executive Council, center_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ A raíz de los ataques terroristas del 13 de noviembre en su ciudad, los parisienses acuden con sus tributos, esperanzas y oraciones a la Plaza de la República. Foto de Lucinda Laird.[Episcopal News Service – Linthicum Heights, Maryland] El Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia episcopal dijo el16 de noviembre que los episcopales deben responder a los recientes ataques en París y Beirut con oración y con discernimiento.El Consejo Expresó su “pesar y tristeza por los que murieron, por los heridos y por aquellos a quienes los recientes actos de terrorismo en París y Beirut les han quebrantado la paz”. La declaración se produjo por medio de una resolución que el Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Defensa Social e Interconexiones del Consejo había redactado el día anterior.La acción del Consejo se produjo luego de que el obispo primado Michael B. Curry llamara el viernes a todos los episcopales a que oraran como respuesta a los actos terroristas de París. El mensaje de Curry, presentado en forma de vídeo, se puede encontrar en la página web de la Iglesia Episcopal y en su página de Facebook. En la mañana del 16 de noviembre, la declaración del Obispo Primado había recibido más de 370.000 visitas en Facebook.Y los miembros del Consejo Ejecutivo convinieron en hacer una colecta dedicada a los esfuerzos del obispo Pierre Whalon de la Convocación de Iglesias Episcopales en Europa y de la Muy Rda. Lucinda Laird, deana de la catedral episcopal de la Santa Trinidad (conocida también como la Catedral Americana en París), para ayudar a personas que sufren de las secuelas de los ataques del 13 de noviembre en París. Clifton Daniel, obispo provisional de Pensilvania y miembro del Consejo, propuso la colecta y sus colegas estuvieron de acuerdo sin que mediara debate.La resolución decía que el Consejo recibió el reto que Whalon emitió al día siguientes de los ataques en París para “recordar que Dios muestra su amor por nosotros precisamente postergando la intervención divina que ansiamos”.“Al día siguiente de este odioso ataque, podemos desear que Dios descienda y barra a nuestros enemigos”, escribió Whalon, según apunta la resolución. “En lugar de eso, Cristo en la cruz, completamente impotente al final, nos muestra que es sólo el amor el que puede vencer el odio, el mal e incluso la muerte”.El Consejo dijo también que acepta “la exhortación” de Laird en que pide que oren “por las víctimas, los que murieron y los que están heridos; por sus familias; por los que han ayudado y están ayudando; por todos los que nos protegen; por la ciudad de París, y especialmente por nuestra comunidad de la catedral [y] por todos aquellos cuya ira, temor y odio los lleva a cometer tales actos…”.La resolución llama también a los episcopales “a volverse a Jesús y pedir orientación, sabiduría y valor mientras buscamos la senda de la gracia y la paz de Dios aun en la oscuridad del momento actual”.Y se sugiere el uso de “Una letanía de la paz en Tierra Santa” durante el Adviento de 2015 “como un acto de rememoración piadosa”.La reunión del Consejo, del 15 al 18 de noviembre tiene lugar en el Centro de Conferencias del Instituto Marítimo.El Consejo Ejecutivo lleva a cabo los programas y políticas adoptadas por la Convención General, según el Canon I.4 (1)(a). El Consejo está compuesto de 38 miembros, 20 de los cuales (cuatro obispos, cuatro presbíteros o diáconos y 12 laicos) son elegidos por la Convención General, y 18 por los nueve sínodos provinciales (un clérigo y un laico cada uno) por períodos de seis años, además del Obispo Primado y el Presidente y el vicepresidente de la Cámara de Diputados. Executive Council November 2015 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags Posted Nov 20, 2015 Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 El Consejo Ejecutivo pide oración y discernimiento después de los ataques terroristas Rector Smithfield, NC last_img read more

‘Dadle vosotros de comer’

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jul 14, 2016 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Church-Community Agriculture This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Episcopal News Service –Seattle, Washington] El tránsito podría circular a lo largo de la autopista Interestatal 5 y los hidroaviones podrían zumbar sobre el lago [que se extiende] más abajo de la catedral de San Marcos [St. Mark’s Cathedral], pero cuando Carolyn White llega al huerto casero de la iglesia el ruido parece desvanecerse.Ella sabe que suena cómico decirlo, pero a pesar del bullicio urbano de Seattle allá abajo, trabajar en el huerto “es realmente un tiempo de quietud [oportuno] para alguna oración y meditación silenciosa —los hábitos que necesito para crecer cada día, si puedo ser sincera”, dijo White en una reciente mañana dominical mientras regaba las plantas.“Encuentro a Dios en el proceso vivificador que cada semilla produce aquí y luego en el ciclo del brote, el crecimiento, la cosecha, la decadencia y la renovación”, afirmó. “Y yo también encuentro a Dios en cómo lo que sucede aquí alimenta a otras personas que son suyas”.El huerto de 15 metros de largo por 3 metros de ancho crece entre la entrada de autos y el punto en que la propiedad de San Marcos se disipa en el cinturón verde de más abajo. Su producto ayuda a alimentar a las 30 mujeres que duermen en el albergue Casa Noel [Noel House], que funciona en el salón parroquial de la catedral de domingo a jueves.La quietud del huerto es, para White, un don para las personas que viven en ciudades. “Estamos perdiendo espacios donde podamos relacionarnos con el mundo natural y sus ciclos”, afirmó ella.“La agricultura comunitaria es sencillamente un modo en que nosotros como congregación —pueblo de fe— podemos reunirnos para ser los mayordomos de la creación a que estamos llamados”, dijo el Muy Rdo. Steven L. Thomason, que ha sido rector y deán de la catedral por casi cuatro años. No sólo el huerto casero y un incipiente huerto urbano ayudan a sostener los ministerios de la catedral, sino que también son ejemplos del compromiso de la catedral con la ecojusticia y la sostenibilidad, añadió.“Dios es nuestra motivación para decir: ‘Vio Dios cuanto había hecho y todo estaba muy bien’ y lejos de nosotros decir otra cosa y [no] tomar en serio esa afirmación: que en la bondad de la creación nos juntamos como parte de esa creación para gloria de Dios y para beneficio de aquellos a los que servimos”, dijo.White y el resto de los miembros de San Marcos no son los únicos en encontrar a Dios y la misión en un huerto de iglesia. Desde Ishpeming en Michigan a El Cajón en California, de Snohomish en el estado de Washington a Oyster Bay en Nueva York, un creciente número de episcopales está regresando a la tierra a alimentar su ministerio y a sus comunidades. Hay huertos diminutos y algunos tan grandes que se transforman en verdaderas granjas. Hay huertos hidropónicos y sofisticados sistemas de compostación.Un grupo de Girl Scouts muestran el fruto de su cosecha en la Granja del Banco de Alimentos [Food Bank Farm] de Snohomish Valley en el estado de Washington. La granja, un ministerio de la iglesia episcopal de la Santa Cruz en Redmond, produjo 62.000 kilogramos de calabacines de invierno el año pasado para un banco de alimentos de la zona. Foto de Food Bank Farm.Hay proyectos a gran escala tales como Semillas de Esperanza y la Mesa Abundante, ambos  ministerios de la Diócesis de Los Ángeles. Y hay esfuerzos más pequeños; por ejemplo, unos pocos canteros en una franja de césped a lo largo de un terreno de estacionamiento o feligreses que cuidan plantas que comienzan a mediados del invierno y las donan a un banco de alimentos que se las dan a clientes con instrucciones respecto a cómo empezar un huerto en tiestos.“Todo el mundo puede hacer algo … No estamos resolviendo la crisis alimentaria del mundo en modo alguno, pero uno tiene que contribuir con su grano de arena”, según dijo Brian Sellers-Petersen, asesor principal del presidente de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo y defensor de la agricultura de iglesia y comunidad.Cuando una iglesia comienza un huerto en su terreno, “añade una clase a su escuela dominical”, afirmó Sellers-Petersen. “Todo lo que uno necesita saber acerca de Dios y el cristianismo lo puede aprender en un huerto”. Hay lecciones de mayordomía, de creación, de cuidado, de muerte y de resurrección.“Siempre me asombro al plantar una semilla en la tierra, algo que al parecer está muerto y que se convierte en algo enorme”, recalcó.La horticultura “nos pone en solidaridad con personas de todo el mundo que dependen de los huertos caseros” de una manera que no les pasa a los estadounidenses, dijo. “Nos ayuda a entender los sistemas de alimentos en el ámbito global si tenemos la oportunidad”.El Proyecto de Horticultura Vida Abundante de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo —un programa infantil interactivo, basado en la Escritura, para parroquias, maestros, familias y otras personas, que se creó para los que buscan compartir el ministerio y la obra de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo con estudiantes de primaria— es un buen instrumento para enseñar también esas lecciones más amplias, dijo Sellers-Petersen.Además, las iglesias, insiste él, pueden ayudar a personas que viven en “desiertos alimentarios” al encontrar maneras de garantizarles “el tener acceso a alimentos frescos que no pueden darse el lujo de comprar en Whole Foods o que sencillamente no tienen el tiempo o los recursos para tomar el autobús e ir a buscar alimentos a una tienda de víveres porque no hay ninguna en su barrio”.El Mapa de Recursos de la Iglesia Episcopal muestra189 congregaciones, escuelas y organizaciones que incluyen “huertos comunitarios”  en sus programas. Esa lista en efecto puede ser sólo una muestra de las entidades episcopales que tienen huertos en sus propiedades y en sus vidas.El Rdo. Kirk T. Berlenbach, rector y apicultor de la iglesia episcopal de San Timoteo [St. Timothy’s], en la sección Roxbourgh de Filadelfia, espera que gotee la miel de un panal. Foto de Apicultores Episcopales [Episcopal Beekeepers] vía Facebook.Sellers-Petersen sospecha que hay muchísimos huertos de iglesias que no están inscritos en ninguna parte. Cuando él comenzó a llevar cuenta de esos proyectos, creó una lista a partir de información oral y conciencia personal, “un montón de retazos de papel en ni escritorio y de tarjetas de presentación comerciales”.Una concentración de proyectos agrícolas de comunidades religiosas está aumentando en el área metropolitana de Seattle de la Diócesis de Olympia donde vive Sellers-Petersen. La catedral de San Marcos, con dos huertos y 20.000 abejas que recientemente se han hospedado en el techo de la catedral (Sellers-Petersen, el incipiente apicultor de la catedral, dice que las abejas realizan “diminutos milagros” al fabricar la miel) no es más que un ejemplo.En las próximas semanas, Episcopal News Service reseñará algunos de los empeños agrícolas de comunidades religiosas de la zona de Seattle.Lea más al respecto* Visite la página de Facebook de la Red Episcopal de Fe, Alimento y Cultivo [Episcopal Faith, Food and Farm Network] aquí para más ejemplos de congregaciones y otras organizaciones episcopales que participan de proyectos agrícolas en comunidades eclesiales.* La Faith Farm & Food Network, parte del Centro Beecken de la Escuela de Teología de la Universidad del Sur, se creó en parte con ayuda de Sellers-Petersen para reunir a episcopales que plantan y comparten alimentos.* Las personas interesadas en la apicultura pueden encontrar a otras con intereses semejantes en la página de Facebook de Apicultores Episcopales [Episcopal Beekeepers Facebook page]* Churchwork es un blog dedicado a “datos y estrategias de la Iglesia, formación cristiana y cuidado de la creación con énfasis en la fe y el alimento”. La Rda. Nurya Love Parish, sacerdote asociada en la iglesia episcopal de San Andrés [St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church] en Grand Rapids, Michigan, ofrece una sección sobre el Movimiento Cristiano de la Alimentación  [Christian food movement] que incluye una guía descargable con sólo facilitar el nombre de pila y una dirección electrónica.* La Iniciativa de Alimento, Fe y Liderazgo Religioso [Food, Faith, and Religious Leadership Initiative] de la Escuela de Teología de Wake Forest, ofrece  una página web de materiales aquí.— La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York ‘Dadle vosotros de comer’ Más congregaciones e instituciones episcopales retornan al huerto The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Servicelast_img read more

Presiding Bishop Michael Curry’s Easter message 2017

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Marilyn McClure says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Katie Thomson says: Holy Week/Easter, April 4, 2017 at 7:28 am Every other article I see on here has PB Curry traveling to some foreign country. Isn’t there enough in the USA to keep him busy? Why is the Episcopal Church funding all these junkets? And thanks Dr. Lund for turning a rather nice Easter message into a Progressive rant. It never ends with you people! The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS April 5, 2017 at 3:13 pm Thank you Bishop Curry! We miss you down here in North Carolina. I teach in the Wake County School system. Thank you for helping me to become an activist for love. Please know our family will be praying for you, your family, our church, and asking God to empower us with his love! April 4, 2017 at 3:38 pm Wonderful to see these responses! Yes I am a voice from the “old days” not too long ago when our presiding bishops such as the late Edmund Browning, PB Frank Griswold when our Spiritual leaders walked(literally) with the bishops of the Diocese of Jerusalem, Bishop Samir Kafity, Suhail Dawani… which included Jordan, Palestine, Gaza, Iraq, Syria, Egypt… then our PB Katherine Jefferts- Schori decided to change her priority to Haiti… and now the Episcopal National Church is not formally represented in the critical Diocese of Jerusalem which now through the U.S. is under continual military seige/occupation with Millions of civilians(children, families suffering/struggling)–Now where is our Humanity and as I tried to remind us Episcopalians our Baptismal Covernant to witness for justice–stand up and speak out for all those voiceless and vulnerable.Yes, I was wondering if our Presiding Bishop Curry may re-assess his mission to resurrect our original dedication to our Dear Lord Jesus Christ in his birthplace, ministry and crucifixion in The Holy Land… Yes The Holy Land is under seige with Death and Destruction mainly due to the U.S. military priority of empire to dominate the Middle East,Easter is a time of Reflection, Rebirth and Renewal–May we all personally and spiritually use this Blessed time to love one another in these Holy days of Stations of the Cross, Good Friday, and Palm Sunday and the Resurrection of our Dear Lord and Saviour on Easter Sunday!Hallelujah–the Lord’s Name be Praised! Nancy Belcher, Deacon says: 3:53[Episcopal News Service] “Go forth to be people of the Resurrection,” Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael B. Curry said in his Easter 2017 message. “Follow in the way of Jesus. Don’t be ashamed to love. Don’t be ashamed to follow Jesus.”The Festive day of Easter is Sunday, April 16.Easter 2017 MessageIt’s taken me some years to realize it, but Jesus didn’t just happen to be in Jerusalem on that first Palm Sunday. He wasn’t on vacation. He wasn’t just hanging out in town. Jesus was in Jerusalem on purpose. He arrived in Jerusalem about the time of the Passover when pilgrims were in the city. When people’s hopes and expectations for the dawn of freedom that Moses had promised in the first Passover might suddenly be realized for them in their time.Jesus arranged his entrance into Jerusalem to send a message. He entered the city, having come in on one side of the city, the scholars tell us, at just about the same time that Pontius Pilate made his entrance on the exact opposite side of the city. Pilate, coming forth on a warhorse. Pilate, with soldiers around him. Pilate, with the insignias of Rome’s Empire. Pilate, representing the Caesars who claimed to be son of god. Pilate, who had conquered through Rome the people of Jerusalem. Pilate, representing the Empire that had taken away their freedom. Pilate, who represented the Empire that would maintain the colonial status of the Jewish people by brute force and violence. Jesus entered the city on the other side, not on a warhorse, but on a donkey, recalling the words of Zechariah:Behold your King comes to youTriumphant and victorious is HeHumble and riding on a donkeyJesus entered the city at the same time as Pilate to show them, and to show us, that God has another way. That violence is not the way. That hatred is not the way. That brute force and brutality are not the way.Jesus came to show us there is another way. The way of unselfish, sacrificial love. That’s why he entered Jerusalem. That’s why he went to the cross. It was the power of that love poured out from the throne of God, that even after the horror of the crucifixion would raise him from death to life. God came among us in the person of Jesus to start a movement. A movement to change the face of the earth. A movement to change us who dwell upon the earth. A movement to change the creation from the nightmare that is often made of it into the dream that God intends for it.He didn’t just happen to be in Jerusalem on that Palm Sunday. He went to Jerusalem for a reason. To send a message. That not even the titanic powers of death can stop the love of God.  On that Easter morning, he rose from the dead, and proclaimed love wins. So you have a blessed Easter. Go forth to be people of the Resurrection. Follow in the way of Jesus. Don’t be ashamed to love. Don’t be ashamed to follow Jesus.Have a blessed Easter.  And bless the world.  Amen.The Most Rev. Michael B. CurryPresiding Bishop and PrimateThe Episcopal Church Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Comments are closed. Fabio A Sotelo says: April 3, 2017 at 7:42 pm “As you must know Islam and the Muslims are under seige in the Middle East.” Wait, what?? While I do not believe in moving the capital of Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, to state that Islam is under siege in the Middle East is a statement that shocks the senses. Had you qualified it by saying Islam is under siege because Sunni and Shia have been at war with each other since the inception of the religion, then it would make sense. While not a perfect situation, Arabs in Israel have citizenship rights, including the right to vote. How about Jews and Christians in the Muslim Kingdoms of the Gulf? How many Jews and Christians are welcome in any of these nations? The answer is none. Let us take Saudi Arabia as an example. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is an Islamic theocratic monarchy in which Sunni Islam is the official state religion based on firm Sharia law and non-Muslims are not allowed to hold Saudi citizenship. Children born to Muslim fathers are by law deemed Muslim, and conversion from Islam to another religion is considered apostasy and punishable by death. Blasphemy against Sunni Islam is also punishable by death, but the more common penalty is a long prison sentence.That said, a Saudi court sentenced a Palestinian man, Ashraf Fayadh, to death for apostasy on November 17, 2015, for alleged blasphemous statements during a discussion group and in a book of his poetry.Religious freedom is virtually non-existent. The Government does not provide legal recognition or protection for freedom of religion, and it is severely restricted in practice. As a matter of policy, the Government guarantees and protects the right to private worship for all, including non-Muslims who gather in homes for religious practice; however, this right is not always respected in practice and is not defined in law.The Saudi Mutaween, or Committee for the Promotion of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice (i.e., the religious police) enforces the prohibition on the public practice of non-Muslim religions. Sharia applies to all people inside Saudi Arabia, regardless of religion.I could continue the discussion by exposing the status of women as second class citizens in the Muslim world, or by exposing the hatred and intolerance of Muslims toward others in their worldwide murderous activities through brutal acts of terrorism, but that is for another day. Islam, the world’s fastest growing religion, under siege? One of the most preposterous, ill-informed statements I have ever heard. Bishop Curry is not obliged to adhere to some “Mission to represent all faiths.” He is the democratically elected leader of a loving, inclusive, enlightened branch of the Jesus Movement, The Episcopal Church. Dr. Erna Lund says: Susan Salisbury says: Press Release Service April 3, 2017 at 8:39 pm I wish to Thank you for you message Presiding Bishop Curry and to wish you a Blessed Easter.God Bless! April 12, 2017 at 7:38 pm Thank you bishop for your words of wisdom and hope. Happy Easter to all, FS+ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Jean Barnes says: April 3, 2017 at 4:24 pm Always a great message. Jesus conquered violence (the cross) and rose victorious over those powers of force and brutality…What a message for us in these turbulent times. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing Dr. Erna Lund says: Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Posted Apr 3, 2017 Jo Ann Haseltine says: Rector Tampa, FL April 3, 2017 at 5:21 pm Thank you for such a wonderful message. I Hope to get to verger’s conference in October to meet you in person. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release April 12, 2017 at 7:39 pm Thank you bishop for your words of wisdom for this Easter season. Happy Easter to all, FS+ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 center_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Presiding Bishop Michael Curry’s Easter message 2017 John Miller says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Scott Ball says: April 3, 2017 at 5:58 pm Presiding Bishop Curry: Will you be going to Jerusalem or Washington D.C. at this highly Critical Time on the Mission to Represent All faiths: Christianity, Judaism, and Islam wherein we have been taught that Jerusalem is the Cradle of these three faiths…not to be dominated officially and/or otherwise by one faith–Judaism and Israeli dominance. As you must know there is a national/presidential and congressional movement for the capital/embassy to be moved/placed in Jerusalem exclusively.We must stand up and speak out against this!! We are relying on you PB Curry,our Spiritual leader and Voice for Compassionate Action for All peoples. As you must know Islam and the Muslims are under seige in the Middle East and also here in the U.S. We all must come together in unity for each other/one another on the common spirit of our Dear Lord Jesus Christ and Mother Mary who are venerated in the Koran(sura/chapter on Jesus); and we are now to celebrate these Glorious Holy Days notably Good Friday…Palm Sunday…Easter Resurrection… We are surrounded by those of Selective Compassion–pick and choose according to one’s religious/political preference!!Please we must exhibit strength of body, mind and spirit despite these negative forces!Hallelujah–the Lord’s name be praised! May we celebrate with you for All peoples as death and destruction dominates our holy places in the Middle East–where is our Humanity that Jesus exemplified for us? Please restore our humanity and humanitarian Mission so clearly denoted in our baptismal pledge and covenant. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC April 5, 2017 at 4:59 pm May you have a blessed Easter. Thank you always for the work that you do to shine the lilght of Christ, in the midst of a fractured world. Presiding Bishop Michael Curry TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Marilyn McClure says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group April 3, 2017 at 4:26 pm Beautiful, LOVE WINS! Thank you Bishop , much needed words in these times,when hate seems to take center stage. Thank you Jesus for showing us the Way. Martha Richards says: April 3, 2017 at 8:49 pm Thank you Scott Ball Rector Albany, NY David Benedict says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bill Louis says: Harry Moncelle says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Tags Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR April 3, 2017 at 10:15 pm Amen Brother Lund, we need to stand together in that Holy City when the call comes to reach out and embrace each other as a Holy people. All our faith leaders need to call us to be there where He was there for us. April 3, 2017 at 4:50 pm We always need to remember that we are a Jesus People. Thanks for the reminder. Rector Martinsville, VA April 4, 2017 at 11:09 am As always your words speak what we need to hear in this broken world. Thanks and a glorious resurrection day to you. Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK April 4, 2017 at 8:31 am In a few words the message of Easter is made clear ” Love wins”. AmenCherian Mathew + Associate Rector Columbus, GA April 4, 2017 at 2:36 pm Thank you Scott, for setting the picture straight. Dr. Erna is certainly off the mark. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cherian Mathew + says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments (18) Featured Events Fabio A Sotelo says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israellast_img read more

Confederate symbols workshop guides priests in confronting past by reexamining…

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Confederate symbols workshop guides priests in confronting past by reexamining it truthfully Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Racial Justice & Reconciliation, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Participants in the workshop on Confederate symbols visit All Saints’ Chapel at Sewanee: The University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee. Photo: Sewanee[Episcopal News Service] When the Rev. Hannah Hooker traveled last week to the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee, she brought along her thoughts of a specific stained-glass window back home in Little Rock, Arkansas, where she serves as associate rector of Christ Episcopal Church. The window depicts Bishop Leonidas Polk preaching at the church’s dedication in 1839.It’s not a conspicuous window – located to one side of the nave, overlooking a breezeway where little light reaches its panes. Only after a longtime parishioner pointed it out did Hooker examine it closely and consider what Polk’s legacy means for her congregation at a time when The Episcopal Church has called on its dioceses and congregations to research and tell the full stories of their historic complicity with slavery, segregation and other systems of racial oppression.Polk, as missionary bishop to the Southwest and later bishop of Louisiana, was a key figure in the founding of Sewanee by Episcopal dioceses in 1857, but he died before the opening of the university, killed in battle during the Civil War while serving as a general for the Confederacy. Today, he has become a problematic figure in the churchwide reexamination of Confederate symbols and memorials in worship spaces.“I sort of am of the opinion that all churches, whether they have Confederate symbols or history, have the opportunity to investigate their own history and sort of own whatever grossness is in their past,” Hooker told Episcopal News Service by phone this week after returning from a three-day Sewanee workshop on those topics.Hooker and 10 other priests attended the university’s inaugural Confederate Symbols and Episcopal Churches Workshop Nov. 5-7. Each priest came from a Southern parish with historical connections to the Confederacy. Some of the priests lead worship services in churches where Confederate symbols are present. Their congregations generally have not yet engaged in full-throated discussions of those symbols’ meanings.At Calvary Episcopal Church in Fletcher, North Carolina, Confederate President Jefferson Davis and Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee are two of the Southern historical figures remembered in stone monuments, more than a dozen in all, arranged in a roadside display outside the church. The rector, the Rev. J. Clarkson, attended the Sewanee workshop on Confederate symbols and described the monuments at his church as “a little bit unusual.”“Figuring out what the church might want to do with them at this point is … a more complicated discussion,” Clarkson said in an interview with ENS.The Rev. Rusty McCown brought to the workshop a different example from St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Franklin, Tennessee, where he is rector. In the parish hall of the 200-year-old church hangs a portrait honoring a prominent early parishioner, but a darker part of the man’s past is hardly acknowledged – that he was a major slaveholder.“I’m kind of a belief we shouldn’t have any portraits at all,” McCown said, though no changes have been discussed yet at his church. He attended the Sewanee workshop looking for guidance in how to approach such conversations in a congregation where some parishioners may be resistant to change.He said he came away from the experience better equipped to lead the planning of his congregation’s upcoming 200th anniversary commemorations, knowing that it is important for a church to “own the history and remember that history, but at the same time, how do we go forward with this?”The Sewanee workshop was a pilot program developed by two seminary graduates, the Rev. Hannah Pommersheim and the Rev. Kellan Day, through the university’s six-year Roberson Project on Slavery, Race, and Reconciliation. The research project, named for late history professor Houston Bryan Roberson, aims to tell the fuller story of the university’s founding and first 100 years within social and economic systems built upon racial injustice.This initial workshop received a $5,000 grant from the Jessie Ball duPont Fund and was only open to Episcopal clergy who are dealing with Confederate symbols at their churches. The workshop’s three parts examined the theological underpinnings of Confederate symbols in worship spaces, provided context for understanding art and symbols and steered participants toward best practices for local action.Pommersheim and Day, working with Sewanee history professor Woody Register, will review feedback from participants and consider future options, such as offering the in-person workshop for a broader pool of ordained and lay Episcopalians or hosting it online. Another option would be to develop a curriculum that dioceses and congregations can follow on their own.“These conversations, we want them to be happening in more churches. We want folks to have tools to have these conversations,” Pommersheim told ENS.The 11 priests who participated in last week’s workshop weren’t expected to return to their congregations and immediately start removing objects connected to the Confederacy, Pommersheim said, though congregations might decide to take such steps after changing and deepening how they engage with their history. “Something actually changing was the goal.”The Sewanee seminary was among the Episcopal institutions that reassessed their own Confederate symbols in the wake of a deadly August 2017 standoff in Charlottesville, Virginia, between white supremacist groups and counterprotesters, who converged in the city amid a legal dispute over its Confederate statutes.In September 2017, Sewanee relocated a monument honoring Edmund Kirby-Smith, a 19th-century professor who previously served as a Confederate general, though even before Charlottesville, the debate over Confederate symbols had divided the campus community. Some of the contention centered around how best to represent Polk’s role in the founding of the university without glorifying his Confederate service.Another focal point for debate has been All Saints’ Chapel. Confederate battle flags were removed from the chapel years ago, but just last year, remaining references to the Confederacy in the chapel’s stained-glass windows generated renewed scrutiny. The university responded in October 2018 by removing a pane from the window that had featured the seal of the Confederacy.Participants in last week’s workshop on Confederate symbols visited All Saints’ Chapel, turning it into a classroom for lessons on the meaning of art and the assessment of art theologically. Sewanee art professor Shelley MacLaren led one of those discussions. Another session, on best practices for congregations, was led by the Rev. Molly Bosscher, who spent four years as associate rector at Richmond, Virginia’s St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, once known as the Cathedral of the Confederacy.The Rev. Jamie Osborne led a session on the theological underpinnings of Confederate symbols in churches. Such symbols are given added spiritual importance when placed in a church, elevating them to “a higher level, a God level” alongside the baptismal font and altar.Osborne brought to the workshop his own experience in Montgomery, Alabama, where he serves as associate rector at St. John’s Episcopal Church. The St. John’s vestry decided in February to remove a plaque and pew that had been known as the “Jefferson Davis pew” because church leaders determined its connection to the Confederate president was tenuous at best and its 1925 dedication had been steeped in racism.“The removal of the plaque and the pew is good for the long-term future of the church,” Osborne told ENS. “But there’s also the deeper conversation of ‘How was it that pew and plaque got there?’”This plaque honoring Leonidas Polk, an Episcopal bishop and Confederate general, was displayed in Christ Church Cathedral in Cincinnati, Ohio, until its removal in 2018. Photo: Sarah Hartwig/Christ Church CathedralThose conversations are happening at Episcopal congregations in all regions of the United States, not just the South. Christ Church Cathedral in Cincinnati, Ohio, removed its own plaque honoring Polk in 2018. More recently, in Boston, the historic Old North Church held a forum in October to discuss its historic links to slavery, acknowledging that slave traders were among the prominent early members who helped pay for the 1740 steeple.Reexamining centuries-old history goes beyond what certain Episcopal congregations might do about the Confederate symbols on church grounds. It’s about racial reconciliation, said the Rev. John Jenkins, associate rector at St. Paul’s Church in Augusta, Georgia.“If you have an older church, your church is a Confederate symbol. It’s a symbol of the whole economic system,” Jenkins told ENS after participating in the Sewanee workshop.Polk’s funeral was held at St. Paul’s in 1864, and the “fighting bishop” once was entombed on the grounds, Jenkins said. A monument honoring Polk takes up space in the sanctuary, as does a flag display that includes a Confederate banner that was known as the Bonnie Blue.Jenkins participated this year in the Justice Pilgrimage organized by the Absalom Jones Center for Racial Healing in the Diocese of Atlanta, and he hopes to mine that experience and the recent Sewanee workshop to help his congregation decide on next steps.“We need to take responsibility for learning our history and confronting it truthfully,” he said.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at d[email protected] Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR center_img Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Theological Education Rector Shreveport, LA By David PaulsenPosted Nov 14, 2019 Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LAlast_img read more

Episcopalians prepare for second COVID-19-restricted Lent with mix of fatigue…

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Lent 2021 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Lent, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA By David PaulsenPosted Feb 15, 2021 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listingcenter_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Tags Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopalians prepare for second COVID-19-restricted Lent with mix of fatigue and perseverance Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls The Rev. Emily Garcia, assistant rector at Church of the Redeemer in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, shows the space she set up for viewing the church’s Easter Vigil in April 2020. This year, churches will be entering their second Lent during the coronavirus pandemic. Photo: Emily Garcia, via Facebook[Episcopal News Service] As rector of Church of the Holy Spirit in Lebanon, New Jersey, the Rev. Philip Carr-Jones has a Lenten plan unlike any in his 37 years as a priest – self-imposed ashes on Ash Wednesday, drive-by palm distribution on Palm Sunday, a Maundy Thursday service on Zoom coinciding with family dinners, online Stations of the Cross for Good Friday and an outdoor Easter Vigil.Carr-Jones, like many Episcopal clergy and lay leaders, says he’s exhausted, with the world now nearly a year into the coronavirus pandemic, but that experience also has prepared congregations as they enter their second Lent under threat of COVID-19. Livestreaming setups are established. Hand sanitizer and face masks are routine accessories for those able to gather in person. Outdoor services are common.And as Episcopalians say personal prayers of repentance this Lent, they also will be joining Carr-Jones in a collective prayer for perseverance, to get through “one more Easter” like this, they hope, for the last time.“The people are saying, ‘I just want to hug,’” Carr-Jones told Episcopal News Service. “We used to spend a good five minutes greeting each other [before services].” Parishioners are desperate to connect with each other face to face, he said, but that won’t be an option again this Lent, while the virus is still spreading.Clergy interviewed for this story spoke of the fatigue they and their congregations are carrying with them into this Lenten season. They said they never expected parish life to be upended this long, now approaching a full lectionary cycle, but they also have learned much in the past year, including how technology can connect people who need to remain physically apart. With vaccination efforts ramping up, they are both hopeful for the future and humbled this year by the solemn themes of Lent.“In some ways, this has felt like a yearlong Lent,” said the Very Rev. Nathan LeRud, dean of Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in Portland, Oregon. “Everybody is just so ready for this to be done.”Ash Wednesday, in particular, feels more important and meaningful this year, LeRud said, and he is “more interested in ashes as a symbol of mortality and the honesty of facing death … rather than a symbol of penitence.”“I think we’re in a time when mortality is confronting us,” LeRud said. COVID-19 can strike anyone at any time, he said, and thousands are dying from it each day in the United States. “Lent is designed to help us confront the reality of our death.”The cathedral will offer ash kits on Feb. 17 for people to take home and impose themselves, or they may receive ashes from priests outside the cathedral. The celebrants will be masked and gloved and will sanitize their hands between each imposition of ashes. In a pandemic twist, the cathedral recruited retired clergy for the task. Those older clergy once were at greater risk from COVID-19, but now their age group has been the first to receive vaccinations.Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in Portland, Oregon, has livestreamed worship services from the cathedral for the past year but has yet to allow parishioners to attend. The congregation hopes to resume limited in-person worship during Lent. Photo: Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, via FacebookThis Lent, LeRud and other clergy said they are emphasizing some of the season’s more positive themes, rather than asking their congregations to dwell solely on repenting of what they’ve done wrong. The Rev. Andy Andrews, rector of the Church of the Holy Trinity in Vicksburg, Mississippi, described this Lent as “a season of healing, a season of rebuilding, a season of sacrifice.”“I feel it in my heart that this is just going to be the most meaningful Lent,” Andrews told ENS. “It seems like we’re breaking into a new beginning.”A cross is set up outside the Church of the Holy Trinity in Vicksburg, Mississippi, for Easter 2020. Photo: Holy Trinity, via FacebookBefore the pandemic, about 140 people worshipped at Holy Trinity each Sunday, and Andrews had never heard of Zoom and was rarely on Facebook. Now, Holy Trinity’s leaders rely on both to engage with the congregation from a distance. The past year has been a roller coaster ride, Andrews said, with in-person worship suspended at first, resuming last summer and halting again in the fall with a new surge in COVID-19 cases.For Ash Wednesday, Holy Trinity will welcome a limited number of worshippers into the church at two services. Details about imposition of ashes are still being worked out. For those who don’t attend the in-person services, a curbside option for ashes will be available.As congregations plan their second round of Holy Week and Easter services during the coronavirus outbreak, which was declared a pandemic in March 2020, this will be the first Ash Wednesday under those conditions. Episcopal leaders are reminding congregations that the ashes are not a sacrament. They aren’t a mandatory part of the Ash Wednesday liturgy and, if included, need not be imposed by a priest.The Rt. Rev. J. Neil Alexander, retired bishop of Atlanta, published an article in January that examined the historical roots of the liturgy. Alexander’s widely shared piece suggests sprinkling the ashes as a possible alternative to rubbing them on foreheads.Diocesan leaders have provided additional guidance to their congregations. The Diocese of Chicago recommended self-imposed ashes as the least risky of several options. Pennsylvania Bishop Daniel Gutiérrez offered a range of options in his diocese, from sprinkling ashes to applying them to foreheads with Q-tips.“The holy season of Lent calls us to remember our mortality,” Gutiérrez said. “Let us take every precaution to protect and preserve the lives of those in our care.”Congregations also are putting fun new spins on old Lenten traditions during the pandemic, starting with Shrove Tuesday on Feb. 16. Carr-Jones, the New Jersey rector, usually cooks the pancakes for Holy Spirit’s annual Shrove Tuesday dinner. This year, he is inviting parishioners to join him online instead, as they cook pancakes together.The Rev. Emily Garcia, assistant rector at Church of the Redeemer in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, is looking forward to joining some members of her congregation for a Shrove Tuesday dance party on Zoom. One person will serve as DJ while participants dance their hearts out, enjoy food at home and interact with each other online.“I’ve got my shoes picked out,” Garcia told ENS.The idea was suggested by two parishioners. If nothing else, it will give participants “something to look forward to” amid the daily uncertainties of life during the pandemic, said Garcia, who leads the church’s youth ministries.Almost a year into the pandemic, Garcia is weary from the “perpetual, low-level anxiety” that she and others feel as they prepare for Lent, but her work on worship services for families has provided an uplifting counterbalance. “I feel real positive and hopeful about that, and I feel especially positive because so many families have made the effort to attend.”In Boca Grande, Florida, the fellowship dinners that St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church usually offers during Lent will return this year but online rather than in person – bring your own soup – and the Rev. Michelle Robertshaw, St. Andrew’s rector, will offer online Evening Prayer on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.Robertshaw senses fatigue but also some excitement, as she and parishioners reimagine how they can engage with each other, especially in this second Lent of the pandemic. “I feel more prepared,” she told ENS. “And I actually feel a little bit more of an opportunity to engage possibilities that I might not have thought of last time around.”Last year, she organized a golf cart parade of palms for Palm Sunday and plans to do that again this year. An ecumenical sunrise service for Easter was canceled this year, but Robertshaw is planning an in-person service at her church. The congregation has limited attendance at its in-person services to 30 people, with advance registration required. Most services are celebrated outdoors, as will the Easter service.“We’re fortunate. We’re in Florida,” she said.A parishioner waves from a golf cart in Boca Grande, Florida, in April 2020 during a Palm Sunday procession organized by St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church. Photo: St. Andrew’s, via YouTubeThe Episcopal Church in Colorado asked its congregations to shift worship to all online services around Advent and Christmas because of the latest surge in coronavirus cases. The case count has decreased since then, giving hope for a return to some in-person worship through Lent.“Last Lent, a lot of us thought that this would be over in a couple months,” said the Rev. Alex Dyer, the diocese’s canon to the ordinary. “There’s a real kind of loss and emotion I’m hearing from priests that, ‘Oh my gosh, we have to do this a second time.’”The pandemic has forced congregations to change many of the tactile Lenten practices they had taken for granted, Dyer said, such as ashes on foreheads for Ash Wednesday and washing of feet on Maundy Thursday. “We’re very incarnational,” he said, and the sense of loss isn’t just over the inability to gather fully. “In another sense, it’s the physicality of each of these rites. We’re not able to do it in the same way.”As with last year, however, the pandemic isn’t canceling Holy Week or Easter, and Dyer said the diocese expects to allow some churches to resume limited in-person worship services this Lent. Often that will mean 10 or fewer worshippers meeting outdoors, though specific guidance will depend on various factors, such as the size of church building and quality of ventilation.Last year, as the pandemic’s initial COVID-19 surge prompted the widespread suspension of in-person worship services, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry voiced his support for dioceses and congregations that were practicing a “Lenten fast” from those gatherings. Helping to slow the virus’ spread was “a sign of love for one’s neighbor,” he said, even if it meant empty pews on Easter.At Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, the fast from in-person worship has yet to end. The Oregon cathedral remains closed to the public, and LeRud, the dean, maintains a weekly routine of online-only services.That doesn’t mean the cathedral has been completely off limits. Two days a week, it accepts “Cathedral Pilgrimage” reservations, so a few individuals at a time can come for up to an hour to pray, meditate, receive some of the cathedral’s reserve Eucharist, light a candle and visit its courtyard and memorial garden.LeRud said he thinks parishioners will treasure those visits this Lent, though he also hopes that, at some point during the season, he will be able to resume in-person worship, which likely will be capped at 50 people at a time.The cathedral had something of a test run on Jan. 30 when it hosted the consecration of Oregon Bishop Diana Akiyama. “There were 50 people in that building, and that was the first time in a year,” LeRud told ENS. “Just the feeling of having people in the building again was such a rush. It was very moving, and we were able to do it safely.”Easter services typically draw a thousand people to the cathedral, LeRud said. Even a small crowd would be a blessing this year. “I don’t think I can do another Easter with an empty cathedral,” he said, but if the COVID-19 case counts surge again, he is prepared to broadcast the service from the cathedral, to a congregation forced to watch from home.Either way, Easter will be a celebration, he said. “We all need a chance to celebrate some kind of new life.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 last_img read more

Summer Olympics Medal Count Update – Final Day

first_img Please enter your comment! 6France10181442 Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. 1United States463738121 2China26182670 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply The 2016 Summer Olympics Medal Count – Final DayThe U.S. finished the Rio Games with 51 more medals than China, finishing with 121 total medals, 46 of which were gold. On Sunday, the U.S. men’s basketball team won its third straight gold, while Kyle Snyder became the youngest American wrestling Olympic champion and the men’s volleyball team added a bronze.Claressa Shields became the first U.S. boxer, male or female, to winn back-to-back gold medals in boxing.American Gaken Rupp won the Bronze medal in the marathon.  It was Rupp’s second marathon race.Athletes from Jordon, Fiji and Kosovo won the first Gold medals for those countries during the Rio Olympics.Here is a a list of all Day 16 U.S. medal winners:GoldMen’s basketballClaressa Shields, Women’s middle 75kg (boxing)Kyle Snyder, Men’s freestyle 97kg (wrestling)BronzeMen’s volleyballGalen Rupp, Men’s marathonThe final Top Ten countries are: 9Italy812828 8Australia8111029 7Japan1282141 Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Share on Facebook Tweet on Twittercenter_img Please enter your name here 3Great Britain27231767 TAGSolympics Previous articleOn This Day: Hurricane Andrew pounds BahamasNext articleBear Lake Elementary students run for funds Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 4Russia19181956 10Canada431522 UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 5Germany17101542 You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here PlaceCountryGoldSilverBronzeTotallast_img read more