Kongsberg in SAR Pact with Norwegian Society for Sea Rescue

first_imgKongsberg Maritime has signed an agreement with the Norwegian Society for Sea Rescue to develop new and innovative maritime Search and Rescue (SAR) technologies. The duo’s collaboration will cover five concept development areas for SAR: maritime operations, rescue operations, search on the surface of the sea, underwater search and digital solutions.Through the agreement, Kongsberg Maritime will provide the Norwegian Society for Sea Rescue with access to its hydroacoustic systems for in depth testing and development on new approaches to SAR.The systems include Kongsberg Maritime’s innovative PulSAR sonar, which can be towed behind a rescue boat to scan large areas of sea in a short time, transmitting images of the seabed and helping divers to navigate directly to targets of interest.The Society will also test the SAR application of Kongsberg Maritime solutions for monitoring diving operations.“We want to ensure that people who are missing at sea and presumed lost are found more quickly,” says Rikke Lind, secretary general of the Norwegian Society for Sea Rescue. “For the next of kin, it is important that presumed victims are found as quickly as possible. Living in uncertainty is an additional strain,” explains Secretary General Rikke Lind. “Sonar search must be much more accessible; we want to have a specialised team who can travel out with the sonar when needed.”“With this cooperation, Kongsberg Maritime and the Norwegian Society for Sea Rescue will test modern technologies to improve search and rescue and make it more effective,” explains Bjørn Jalving, senior vice president, Subsea at Kongsberg Maritime. “We are proud to be able to work together with the Society and contribute to its incredibly important work.”last_img read more

Riise stresses need for more goals

first_img Now former Liverpool full-back Riise believes Fulham must be far more cut-throat when on the ball against Chris Hughton’s Norwich, to lead into Saturday’s imposing league trip to Arsenal. “We had 60 per cent possession (against Sunderland), we dominated possession but we didn’t take our chances,” Riise told Fulham’s official website. “We should be more experienced to keep control of the game, especially when we got back to 2-1. “We’ve been conceding too many goals, especially from set-pieces. “We have to do better in games like this, and now we’ve definitely got to get the win against Norwich.” Fulham boss Meulensteen hopes loan signing Clint Dempsey will quickly hit the form that so endeared him to Craven Cottage regulars in his first stint at the club. United States forward Dempsey, on loan from Seattle Sounders, scored 50 league goals for Fulham between 2007 and 2012. And after two quick appearances at the start of his second Fulham stint, Meulensteen expects him to hit full form. “It won’t take long for him to be right back up there,” said Fulham’s head coach. “He’s just got to keep working, but that’s his character and that’s exactly what we know he will do.” Clinical finishing is the only route to Barclays Premier League safety for Fulham now, according to John Arne Riise. Press Associationcenter_img The Fulham defender has challenged his side to sharpen up in front of goal for Tuesday night’s FA Cup third-round replay against Norwich at Craven Cottage. Rene Meulensteen’s side were swatted aside 4-1 by Sunderland on Saturday, in a dispiriting league defeat in west London that drags Fulham straight back into the relegation picture. last_img read more

Football adds two five-star receivers to recruiting class

first_imgLillian Zeng / Daily TrojanUSC football continued a trend of strong recruiting at the wide receiver position Saturday, earning verbal commits from five-star playmakers Bru McCoy and Kyle Ford. The two California products make it three straight years that the Trojans have reeled in a five-star receiver.McCoy, a product of Mater Dei High School, won MaxPrep’s National Player of the Year Award and will join freshman Amon-Ra St. Brown, his high school teammate, in the Trojan receiving corps. He is 247 Sports’ seventh-ranked overall prospect, while Ford checks in at No. 29 in the composite rankings.McCoy signed his letter of intent by the Early Signing Day deadline on Dec. 19. Ford, along with four-star wide receiver Puka Nacua and running back Jordan Wilmore, are hard commits to USC’s 2019 class. Including the hard commits and players who signed their letter of intent on Early Signing Day, USC has 22 incoming freshmen.Four-star offensive tackle Jason Rodriguez is USC’s highest-rated signee of the early period and boasts a monstrous 6-foot-6, 326-pound frame. The Trojans also added three-star offensive guard Tilini Livai from Narbonne High School in Harbor City.“We were really excited to get this young man and what he brings to the table with size,” head coach Clay Helton said of Rodriguez. “He’s one that could step in and help us with depth immediately.”The leading signee early in the day was four-star cornerback Max Williams from Junipero Serra High School in Gardena. The second signee after three-star quarterback Kedon Slovis, Williams was not the only defensive back who signed with the Trojans. Three-star safety Briton Allen from IMG Academy in Florida will provide greater depth for a safety position that was depleted due to injuries in 2018, while three-star cornerback Trey Davis will come down from Washington to battle for playing time.“One of the more special athletes, we thought, out of the city,” Helton said of Williams. “[He has] the ability to play corner or nickel and is very quick-twitch.”The Trojans gained a pair of four-star tight ends with Jude Wolfe from St. John Bosco High School and Ethan Rae from Orange Lutheran High School. Both standing at least 6-foot-4 and 240 pounds, the duo present the team with a greater number of red zone options moving forward. Helton said that he thought both players are among the best in the country at their position. The team plans on using them as in-line tight ends because of their athleticism and ball skills, Helton said.USC also added to its strongest position: wide receiver. Four-star Drake London from Moorpark should become a familiar face on campus as a two-sport recruit for both the football and basketball teams. Munir McClain, a three-star receiver from JSerra Catholic High School in San Juan Capistrano, will join his brother Abdul-Malik, who served as a freshman linebacker for the Trojans this season. Three-star running back Kenan Christon out of Madison High School in San Diego adds to a talented group of running backs.Furthermore, the Trojans added three linebackers to an already solid group. The highlight of the trio is four-star Maninoa Tufono, who joins fellow Hawaiian freshman Palaie Gaoteote at inside linebacker. In addition, the Trojans secured three-star recruits Ralen Goforth from St. John Bosco and Stanley Ta’ufo’ou from Grace Brethren High School in Simi Valley.Four-star Centennial defensive end Drake Jackson’s announcement that he would be committing to USC rather than Pac-12 South rival Arizona State marked a huge win for a Trojan defensive line that sought to replace departing senior linebacker Porter Gustin. Three-stars Nick Figueroa out of Riverside C.C. High School and Gino Quinones from St. Louis High School in Honolulu add depth at defensive end.“[He has] one of the unique body types that is out there, kind of a hybrid outside linebacker and defensive end,” Helton said of Jackson. “He can stand up or put his hand on the ground, he’s a really unique pass rusher.”Three-star defensive tackle Dejon Benton from Pittsburg High School rounds out the Trojans’ early class. USC’s 2019 class ranks 13th in the country following McCoy and Ford’s commitments, according to 247 Sports.last_img read more

COACH’S VISION: Sarah Cooper’s lacrosse IQ makes her a top defensive asset

first_imgAlong the sideline at the Lax for the Cure Tournament, Butch Marino and Sarah Cooper couldn’t decipher the offense on the field. It was the summer of 2015 in New Egypt, New Jersey, and college coaches packed the stands scouting the country’s best club teams.Marino’s TLC Red team had already won its semifinal earlier in the day and was looking to scout potential championship opponents. The Long Island Yellow Jackets, running a similar backer zone that Marino’s team deployed, neared an upset by the Hero’s Tournament Lacrosse Club.Marino, a member of the 1994 gold-medal U.S. men’s lacrosse team, couldn’t figure out how Hero’s was beating the Yellow Jacket zone. Yet Cooper, his zone backer, saw what her head coach couldn’t.“(Cooper) said, ‘Hey, Coach Butch, do you see Hero’s? Every time they’re on offense, every single time, they’re skipping the second pass,’” Marino remembered. “Which is smart: ball movement is the key to beating a backer zone.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textRather than make the simple pass to the closest teammate, Hero’s would use that attack as a dummy — launching the ball over the decoy to another attack — and make it an almost-impossible amount of ground for the backer to cover. In TLC’s championship victory that same day, Cooper led a defense that Marino said “rocked” Hero’s, holding them to just one goal.“All you,” Marino said to her after the game. “That was all you.”It’s Cooper’s mental ability to read the game and make changes “on the fly” that made her the top defensive recruit in her class, head coach Gary Gait said. She caused a team-high 33 turnovers despite being the only first-year starter on defense and enters 2020 as the reigning ACC freshman of the year. But if Cooper and the Orange want to achieve their national championship goal, she knows she’ll have to take her game to another level. Still, it wouldn’t be Cooper’s first time making a sophomore surge.,Six years ago, Cooper emerged from the shower in her Lutherville, Maryland home and saw the email she had been waiting for. It was from her high school — the Catholic, all-girls Notre Dame Preparatory School — announcing who had made the varsity and junior varsity rosters.Then-freshman Cooper quickly scrolled through the varsity roster, scanning for her name. It wasn’t there. When she found her name on the JV list, she wasn’t upset for long.“I never try to be super hard on myself,” Cooper said, “because that’s when I get too nervous and make a mistake or not play how I want to play because I’m putting too much stress on myself.”ND Prep head coach Mac Ford admitted it was a mistake to omit Cooper from the varsity team that year, but he and Cooper agree that a year on JV aided her development. While several of Cooper’s freshman friends languished on the 46-girl varsity team without much playing time, Cooper excelled.Her calm approach is somewhat famous in the Syracuse locker room, and she admits teammates have caught her dozing off before games. Cooper dislikes music with beats that pump up other players, instead opting for slower songs that clear her mind.It’s a balancing act for Cooper, who admits her humble and “unassuming” demeanor, as Ford puts it, has sometimes led her to be overly tentative on the field. In her sophomore year at Notre Dame, Ford rectified his error from the prior year, making Cooper an immediate varsity starter.She would always make the right call. She was like our coach on the field.-ND Prep coach Mac FordAt first, Cooper was nervous. She ran away when she thought someone was about to throw her a pass. Even though she displayed superb skills in practice, Cooper preferred to fade out of the spotlight and into the background during games. One day, Ford had seen enough and pulled her aside.“Hey, you have as good of stickwork as anybody. You should be handling the ball and clearing the ball by yourself,” Ford said to her.“And all of a sudden, everything clicked for her,” he said.Cooper, whom Ford tabbed the “consummate teammate,” said she realized her hesitancy was harming her team, which was the last thing she wanted. From then on, Cooper played with the poise of a veteran, making suggestions to the Notre Dame coaching staff just like she had with Marino at the Lax for the Cure tournament.During Cooper’s junior year, Notre Dame was down big to Bishop Ireton (Virginia) High School and Lexi LeDoyen, now one of Cooper’s roommates at SU. When Cooper subbed out, she told Ford and the coaching staff they needed to switch from zone to man-to-man. Cooper said she had just gotten a feeling it would work, and as Ford recalls, she took LeDoyen in man and shut her down.“She would always make the right call,” Ford said. “She was like our coach on the field.”Part of Cooper’s advanced mental abilities comes from her relentless approach. Marino recalled taking his daughter Alex — Cooper’s current teammate and roommate — to St. Paul’s Prep School in Brooklandville, Maryland on days TLC didn’t have practice. Often when they arrived, Cooper was already there, working on her game alone with the goals that were up year-round. Before she had her driver’s license, Cooper begged her parents to take her to practice an hour early.Cooper said there were times this past fall when she’d forget they had off days. She’d follow her normal routine, waking up early to be at the facility an hour before non-existent 8 a.m. practices.“I’d be looking around like, I have the first (parking) spot at Manley, this is awesome,” Cooper said. “And then I’d be like, ‘Oh, we don’t have practice today.’”Even when she remembers it’s an off day, Cooper can’t stay away from lacrosse completely. Sometimes, she’ll ask a teammate to go and work out or play wall ball. Last fall, when each player was sent their login to SU’s new film system, Cooper immediately signed in and began scouting the upcoming season’s opponents. She sifted through the different offenses, the attack players. The games were still months away, but that didn’t mean Cooper couldn’t start.Cover photo by Molly Gibbs | Senior Staff Photographer Comments Published on February 6, 2020 at 1:28 am Contact Alex: athamer@syr.edu | @alexhamer8,Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.last_img read more